open access

Vol 49, No 2 (2017)
Special articles
Published online: 2017-05-22
Submitted: 2017-03-01
Accepted: 2017-05-01
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Zaktualizowany protokół postępowania u chorych wymagających zastosowania pozaustrojowej oksygenacji krwi (ECMO) w leczeniu ostrej niewydolności oddechowej dorosłych. Zalecenia i wytyczne Zespołu ds. Terapii ECMO Żylno-Żylnym, powołanego przez konsultanta

Romuald Lango, Zbigniew Szkulmowski, Dariusz Maciejewski, Andrzej Sosnowski, Krzysztof Kusza
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2017.0028
·
Pubmed: 28643320
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(2):88-99.

open access

Vol 49, No 2 (2017)
Special articles
Published online: 2017-05-22
Submitted: 2017-03-01
Accepted: 2017-05-01

Abstract

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) has become well established technique of the treatment of severe acute respiratory failure (Veno-Venous ECMO) or circulatory failure (Veno-Arterial ECMO) which enables effective blood oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal for several weeks. Veno-Venous ECMO (V-V ECMO ) is a lifesaving treatment of patients in whom severe ARDS makes artificial lung ventilation unlikely to provide satisfactory blood oxygenation for preventing further vital organs damage and progression to death. The protocol below regards exclusively veno-venous ECMO treatment as a support for blood gas conditioning by means of extracorporeal circuit in adult patients with severe ARDS. V-V ECMO does not provide treatment for acutely and severely diseased lungs, but it enables patient to survive the critical phase of severe ARDS until recovery of lung function. Besides avoiding patients death from hypoxemia, this technique can also prevent further progression of the lung damage due to artificial ventilation. Recent experience of ECMO treatment since the outbreak of AH1N1 influenza pandemic in 2009, along with technical progress and advancement in understanding pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury, have contributed to significant improvement of the results of ECMO treatment. Putative factors related to increased survival include patients retrieval after connecting them to ECMO, and less intensive anticoagulation protocols. The aim of presenting this revised protocol was to improve the effects of ECMO treatment in patients with severe ARDS, to enhance ECMO accessibility for patients who might possibly benefit from this treatment, to reduce time until patient’s connection to ECMO, and to avoid ECMO treatment in futile cases. The authors believe that this protocol, based on recent papers and their own experience, can provide help and advice both for the centers which develop V-V ECMO program, and for doctors who will refer their patients for the treatment in an ECMO center.

Abstract

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) has become well established technique of the treatment of severe acute respiratory failure (Veno-Venous ECMO) or circulatory failure (Veno-Arterial ECMO) which enables effective blood oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal for several weeks. Veno-Venous ECMO (V-V ECMO ) is a lifesaving treatment of patients in whom severe ARDS makes artificial lung ventilation unlikely to provide satisfactory blood oxygenation for preventing further vital organs damage and progression to death. The protocol below regards exclusively veno-venous ECMO treatment as a support for blood gas conditioning by means of extracorporeal circuit in adult patients with severe ARDS. V-V ECMO does not provide treatment for acutely and severely diseased lungs, but it enables patient to survive the critical phase of severe ARDS until recovery of lung function. Besides avoiding patients death from hypoxemia, this technique can also prevent further progression of the lung damage due to artificial ventilation. Recent experience of ECMO treatment since the outbreak of AH1N1 influenza pandemic in 2009, along with technical progress and advancement in understanding pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury, have contributed to significant improvement of the results of ECMO treatment. Putative factors related to increased survival include patients retrieval after connecting them to ECMO, and less intensive anticoagulation protocols. The aim of presenting this revised protocol was to improve the effects of ECMO treatment in patients with severe ARDS, to enhance ECMO accessibility for patients who might possibly benefit from this treatment, to reduce time until patient’s connection to ECMO, and to avoid ECMO treatment in futile cases. The authors believe that this protocol, based on recent papers and their own experience, can provide help and advice both for the centers which develop V-V ECMO program, and for doctors who will refer their patients for the treatment in an ECMO center.

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Keywords

extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; ECMO; ARDS; acute respiratory failure

About this article
Title

Zaktualizowany protokół postępowania u chorych wymagających zastosowania pozaustrojowej oksygenacji krwi (ECMO) w leczeniu ostrej niewydolności oddechowej dorosłych. Zalecenia i wytyczne Zespołu ds. Terapii ECMO Żylno-Żylnym, powołanego przez konsultanta

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 49, No 2 (2017)

Pages

88-99

Published online

2017-05-22

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2017.0028

Pubmed

28643320

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(2):88-99.

Keywords

extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
ECMO
ARDS
acute respiratory failure

Authors

Romuald Lango
Zbigniew Szkulmowski
Dariusz Maciejewski
Andrzej Sosnowski
Krzysztof Kusza

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