open access

Vol 49, No 2 (2017)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2017-05-04
Submitted: 2017-02-15
Accepted: 2017-05-01
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The effects of nursing activities on the intra-abdominal pressure of patients at risk for intra-abdominal hypertension

Rosemary K. Lee
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2017.0020
·
Pubmed: 28502072
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(2):116-121.

open access

Vol 49, No 2 (2017)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2017-05-04
Submitted: 2017-02-15
Accepted: 2017-05-01

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) occurs frequently in critically ill patients, and adds to their morbidity and mortality. There is no published evidence on the effects of nursing activities on the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) for patients at risk of IAH. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of hygiene care on the IAP of patients at risk for IAH.

METHODS: Hygiene care was provided to 34 at-risk patients. IAP was measured prior to initiating the hygiene care, immediately after and 10 minutes later. This was a quasi-experimental, pre-test/ post-test design.

RESULTS: The 10 minute post-hygiene care measurement of the IAP was significantly lower than the pre or immediate post-measurement of the IAP. There were no significant changes in the mean arterial pressure (MAP) or the abdominal perfusion pressure (APP).

CONCLUSIONS: It is safe and possibly therapeutic to provide hygiene care to patients at risk for IAH.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) occurs frequently in critically ill patients, and adds to their morbidity and mortality. There is no published evidence on the effects of nursing activities on the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) for patients at risk of IAH. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of hygiene care on the IAP of patients at risk for IAH.

METHODS: Hygiene care was provided to 34 at-risk patients. IAP was measured prior to initiating the hygiene care, immediately after and 10 minutes later. This was a quasi-experimental, pre-test/ post-test design.

RESULTS: The 10 minute post-hygiene care measurement of the IAP was significantly lower than the pre or immediate post-measurement of the IAP. There were no significant changes in the mean arterial pressure (MAP) or the abdominal perfusion pressure (APP).

CONCLUSIONS: It is safe and possibly therapeutic to provide hygiene care to patients at risk for IAH.

Get Citation

Keywords

nursing activities, intra-abdominal pressure; intra-abdominal hypertension; physiologic monitoring

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About this article
Title

The effects of nursing activities on the intra-abdominal pressure of patients at risk for intra-abdominal hypertension

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 49, No 2 (2017)

Pages

116-121

Published online

2017-05-04

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2017.0020

Pubmed

28502072

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(2):116-121.

Keywords

nursing activities
intra-abdominal pressure
intra-abdominal hypertension
physiologic monitoring

Authors

Rosemary K. Lee

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