open access

Vol 48, No 4 (2016)
Original and clinical articles
Submitted: 2016-10-28
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A comparison of selective and conventional spinal anaesthesia for ambulatory surgery

Andrzej Daszkiewicz, Andrzej Janik, Magdalena Śliwczyńska, Jacek Karpe, Hanna Misiołek
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.2016.0046
·
Pubmed: 27797093
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2016;48(4):220-227.

open access

Vol 48, No 4 (2016)
Original and clinical articles
Submitted: 2016-10-28

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Selective spinal anaesthesia is the practice of employing minimal doses of intrathecal agents so that only the nerve roots supplying a specific area and only the modalities that require to be anaesthetised are affected. The study is based on the hypothesis that small dose lidocaine spinal anaesthesia may be adequate for elective surgical procedures, providing limited motor and sensory block, and thus enabling earlier patient’s discharge. The aim of this study was the comparison of the low and the conventional dose of lidocaine spinal anaesthesia discharge time.

METHODS: The study was a prospective, randomized controlled single-blind trial, with 84 patients enrolled. Patients in study group (SS-L, Selective Spinal Lidocaine) were administered 3 mL of a 0.8% lidocaine solution containing 24 mg of lidocaine and 15 μg of fentanyl for spinal anaesthesia. Patients in the control group (CD-L, Conventional Dose Lidocaine) received 5 mL of a 1% lidocaine solution containing 50 mg of lidocaine and 25 μg of fentanyl for spinal anaesthesia. Discharge time was evaluated.

RESULTS: In the SS-L group time to discharge were shorter (P < 0.01) compared to the CD-L group.

CONCLUSION: Selective spinal anaesthesia with low dose of lidocaine decreases the time of patient discharge compared with conventional lidocaine dose spinal anaesthesia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Selective spinal anaesthesia is the practice of employing minimal doses of intrathecal agents so that only the nerve roots supplying a specific area and only the modalities that require to be anaesthetised are affected. The study is based on the hypothesis that small dose lidocaine spinal anaesthesia may be adequate for elective surgical procedures, providing limited motor and sensory block, and thus enabling earlier patient’s discharge. The aim of this study was the comparison of the low and the conventional dose of lidocaine spinal anaesthesia discharge time.

METHODS: The study was a prospective, randomized controlled single-blind trial, with 84 patients enrolled. Patients in study group (SS-L, Selective Spinal Lidocaine) were administered 3 mL of a 0.8% lidocaine solution containing 24 mg of lidocaine and 15 μg of fentanyl for spinal anaesthesia. Patients in the control group (CD-L, Conventional Dose Lidocaine) received 5 mL of a 1% lidocaine solution containing 50 mg of lidocaine and 25 μg of fentanyl for spinal anaesthesia. Discharge time was evaluated.

RESULTS: In the SS-L group time to discharge were shorter (P < 0.01) compared to the CD-L group.

CONCLUSION: Selective spinal anaesthesia with low dose of lidocaine decreases the time of patient discharge compared with conventional lidocaine dose spinal anaesthesia.

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Keywords

chirurgia ambulatoryjna; znieczulenie; znieczulenie podpajęczynówkowe wybiórcze znieczulenie podpajęczynówkowe; leki miejscowo znieczulające, lidokaina; opioidy, fentanyl

About this article
Title

A comparison of selective and conventional spinal anaesthesia for ambulatory surgery

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 48, No 4 (2016)

Pages

220-227

DOI

10.5603/AIT.2016.0046

Pubmed

27797093

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2016;48(4):220-227.

Keywords

chirurgia ambulatoryjna
znieczulenie
znieczulenie podpajęczynówkowe wybiórcze znieczulenie podpajęczynówkowe
leki miejscowo znieczulające
lidokaina
opioidy
fentanyl

Authors

Andrzej Daszkiewicz
Andrzej Janik
Magdalena Śliwczyńska
Jacek Karpe
Hanna Misiołek

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