open access

Vol 48, No 5 (2016)
Review articles
Published online: 2016-11-08
Submitted: 2016-10-12
Accepted: 2016-11-05
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Anaesthesia management for non-cardiac surgery in children with congenital heart disease

Tomohiro Yamamoto, Ehrenfried Schindler
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2016.0050
·
Pubmed: 27824219
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2016;48(5):305-313.

open access

Vol 48, No 5 (2016)
Review articles
Published online: 2016-11-08
Submitted: 2016-10-12
Accepted: 2016-11-05

Abstract

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common form of congenital abnormality and occurs in over 1% of newborns. Approximately 30% of children with CHD have other extra-cardiac anomalies, which significantly increases mortality in CHD patients. It is expected that the number of CHD patients who consult non-specialized hospitals for non-cardiac surgery after palliative or corrective operations will increase because of the extraordinary progression of treatments, such as surgical procedures, interventional procedures, and intensive care medicine, as well as diagnosis. The aim of this article is to enable anaesthesiologists who are not usually engaged in the anaesthesia management of CHD patients to provide perioperative management for CHD patients safely and with confidence by having basic and advanced knowledge about CHD patients and their pathophysiological characteristics.

Abstract

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common form of congenital abnormality and occurs in over 1% of newborns. Approximately 30% of children with CHD have other extra-cardiac anomalies, which significantly increases mortality in CHD patients. It is expected that the number of CHD patients who consult non-specialized hospitals for non-cardiac surgery after palliative or corrective operations will increase because of the extraordinary progression of treatments, such as surgical procedures, interventional procedures, and intensive care medicine, as well as diagnosis. The aim of this article is to enable anaesthesiologists who are not usually engaged in the anaesthesia management of CHD patients to provide perioperative management for CHD patients safely and with confidence by having basic and advanced knowledge about CHD patients and their pathophysiological characteristics.

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Keywords

anaesthesia, children, congenital heart diseases, extra-cardiac anomalies, Fontan and hemi-Fontan circulation, Ohm’s law, pulmonary vascular resistance

About this article
Title

Anaesthesia management for non-cardiac surgery in children with congenital heart disease

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 48, No 5 (2016)

Pages

305-313

Published online

2016-11-08

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2016.0050

Pubmed

27824219

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2016;48(5):305-313.

Keywords

anaesthesia
children
congenital heart diseases
extra-cardiac anomalies
Fontan and hemi-Fontan circulation
Ohm’s law
pulmonary vascular resistance

Authors

Tomohiro Yamamoto
Ehrenfried Schindler

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