open access

Vol 48, No 5 (2016)
Review articles
Published online: 2016-11-18
Submitted: 2016-10-20
Accepted: 2016-11-16
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Infraclavicular access to the axillary vein — new possibilities for the catheterization of the central veins in the intensive care unit

Ryszard Gawda, Tomasz Czarnik, Lidia Łysenko
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2016.0055
·
Pubmed: 27869288
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2016;48(5):360-366.

open access

Vol 48, No 5 (2016)
Review articles
Published online: 2016-11-18
Submitted: 2016-10-20
Accepted: 2016-11-16

Abstract

Central vein cannulation is one of the most commonly performed procedures in intensive care. Traditionally, the jugular and subclavian vein are recommended as the first choice option. Nevertheless, these attempts are not always obtainable for critically ill patients. For this reason, the axillary vein seems to be a rational alternative approach. In this narrative review, we evaluate the usefulness of the infraclavicular access to the axillary vein. The existing evidence suggests that infraclavicular approach to the axillary vein is a reliable method of central vein catheterization, especially when performed with ultrasound guidance.

Abstract

Central vein cannulation is one of the most commonly performed procedures in intensive care. Traditionally, the jugular and subclavian vein are recommended as the first choice option. Nevertheless, these attempts are not always obtainable for critically ill patients. For this reason, the axillary vein seems to be a rational alternative approach. In this narrative review, we evaluate the usefulness of the infraclavicular access to the axillary vein. The existing evidence suggests that infraclavicular approach to the axillary vein is a reliable method of central vein catheterization, especially when performed with ultrasound guidance.

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Keywords

central vein, cannulation; axillary vein, infraclavicular access; ultrasound; intensive care

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About this article
Title

Infraclavicular access to the axillary vein — new possibilities for the catheterization of the central veins in the intensive care unit

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 48, No 5 (2016)

Pages

360-366

Published online

2016-11-18

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2016.0055

Pubmed

27869288

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2016;48(5):360-366.

Keywords

central vein
cannulation
axillary vein
infraclavicular access
ultrasound
intensive care

Authors

Ryszard Gawda
Tomasz Czarnik
Lidia Łysenko

References (52)
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