open access

Vol 48, No 4 (2016)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2016-09-30
Submitted: 2016-06-12
Accepted: 2016-09-23
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Anaphylaxis and cardiac surgery for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy: a case report and review of anaesthetic management

Kevin Fu Hong Yee, Marcin Wasowicz
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2016.0042
·
Pubmed: 27689430
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2016;48(4):252-256.

open access

Vol 48, No 4 (2016)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2016-09-30
Submitted: 2016-06-12
Accepted: 2016-09-23

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper is to describe clinical management in a situation where patient has experienced anaphylaxis while undergoing surgical septal myectomy for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM).

CASE REPORT: A 40-yr-old female was scheduled to undergo surgical septal myectomy for the treatment of HOCM. After induction, the patient developed refractory hypotension that did not respond to escalating doses of vasopressors and volume therapy. Although a clinical examination led to the diagnosis of anaphylaxis, epinephrine, which is the usual treatment of choice, failed to improve the patient’s haemodynamics. A transesophageal echocardiography revealed a worsening of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) after epinephrine administration. In the end, the rapid institution of a cardiopulmonary bypass was required as a rescue therapy instead of to save a patient.

CONCLUSION: The anaesthetic goals in a patient in HOCM are to maintain preload and afterload and to avoid stimulation of inotropy and chronotropy to leading to left ventricular outflow obstruction. In a patient with anaphylaxis, maintaining these haemodynamic goals becomes much more difficult since the pathophysiology and usual treatment of choice will worsen LVOTO. Special consideration for the need to have extracorporeal life support to treat refractory hypotension in surgical patients with HOCM may be warranted.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper is to describe clinical management in a situation where patient has experienced anaphylaxis while undergoing surgical septal myectomy for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM).

CASE REPORT: A 40-yr-old female was scheduled to undergo surgical septal myectomy for the treatment of HOCM. After induction, the patient developed refractory hypotension that did not respond to escalating doses of vasopressors and volume therapy. Although a clinical examination led to the diagnosis of anaphylaxis, epinephrine, which is the usual treatment of choice, failed to improve the patient’s haemodynamics. A transesophageal echocardiography revealed a worsening of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO) after epinephrine administration. In the end, the rapid institution of a cardiopulmonary bypass was required as a rescue therapy instead of to save a patient.

CONCLUSION: The anaesthetic goals in a patient in HOCM are to maintain preload and afterload and to avoid stimulation of inotropy and chronotropy to leading to left ventricular outflow obstruction. In a patient with anaphylaxis, maintaining these haemodynamic goals becomes much more difficult since the pathophysiology and usual treatment of choice will worsen LVOTO. Special consideration for the need to have extracorporeal life support to treat refractory hypotension in surgical patients with HOCM may be warranted.

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Keywords

cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic; anaphylaxis; anesthesia

About this article
Title

Anaphylaxis and cardiac surgery for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy: a case report and review of anaesthetic management

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 48, No 4 (2016)

Pages

252-256

Published online

2016-09-30

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2016.0042

Pubmed

27689430

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2016;48(4):252-256.

Keywords

cardiomyopathy
hypertrophic
anaphylaxis
anesthesia

Authors

Kevin Fu Hong Yee
Marcin Wasowicz

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