open access

Vol 49, No 1 (2017)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2017-02-19
Submitted: 2016-04-24
Accepted: 2016-12-18
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Is the change of percutaneous oxygen pressure available to judge the effects of brachial plexus block?

Tomoki Nishiyama
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2017.0003
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(1):53-56.

open access

Vol 49, No 1 (2017)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2017-02-19
Submitted: 2016-04-24
Accepted: 2016-12-18

Abstract

BACKGROUND: To know the objective methods of the effects of the brachial plexus block, we studied the changes in percutaneous oxygen pressure (tcPO2) with the hypothesis that tcPO2 increases significantly on the blocked arm in comparison with the non-blocked arm, a phenomenon which is connected with vasodilation following the brachial plexus block.

METHODS: Fifteen patients scheduled for upper extremity surgery, aged 20 to 70 years, with ASA physical status I or II were included. Before anaesthesia, the electrodes used to measure tcPO2 were put on the radial side of the forearm and upper arm of both the right and left sides (a total of 4 electrodes). Oxygen at 6 L min-1 was administered by a facial mask. Once midazolam 1–2 mg and fentanyl 50 μg had been administered intravenously, a propofol infusion was started at a dose of 2 mg kg-1 h-1. The interscalene block was performed by means of a nerve stimulator, using 20 mL of 1% lidocaine solution combined with 20 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine solution. TcPO2 was measured just before the block and 30 minutes after the block.

RESULTS: TcPO2 in both forearm and upper arm significantly increased after the block in both sides namely, blocked and non-blocked. No difference was observed in tcPO2 between the blocked side and non-blocked side.

CONCLUSION: Changes of tcPO2 are not useful in order to assess the effects of the interscalene block under oxygen administration.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: To know the objective methods of the effects of the brachial plexus block, we studied the changes in percutaneous oxygen pressure (tcPO2) with the hypothesis that tcPO2 increases significantly on the blocked arm in comparison with the non-blocked arm, a phenomenon which is connected with vasodilation following the brachial plexus block.

METHODS: Fifteen patients scheduled for upper extremity surgery, aged 20 to 70 years, with ASA physical status I or II were included. Before anaesthesia, the electrodes used to measure tcPO2 were put on the radial side of the forearm and upper arm of both the right and left sides (a total of 4 electrodes). Oxygen at 6 L min-1 was administered by a facial mask. Once midazolam 1–2 mg and fentanyl 50 μg had been administered intravenously, a propofol infusion was started at a dose of 2 mg kg-1 h-1. The interscalene block was performed by means of a nerve stimulator, using 20 mL of 1% lidocaine solution combined with 20 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine solution. TcPO2 was measured just before the block and 30 minutes after the block.

RESULTS: TcPO2 in both forearm and upper arm significantly increased after the block in both sides namely, blocked and non-blocked. No difference was observed in tcPO2 between the blocked side and non-blocked side.

CONCLUSION: Changes of tcPO2 are not useful in order to assess the effects of the interscalene block under oxygen administration.

Get Citation

Keywords

brachial plexus block, interscalene block; brachial plexus blockade, efficacy; percutaneous oxygen pressure

About this article
Title

Is the change of percutaneous oxygen pressure available to judge the effects of brachial plexus block?

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 49, No 1 (2017)

Pages

53-56

Published online

2017-02-19

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2017.0003

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(1):53-56.

Keywords

brachial plexus block
interscalene block
brachial plexus blockade
efficacy
percutaneous oxygen pressure

Authors

Tomoki Nishiyama

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