open access

Vol 48, No 3 (2016)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2016-04-28
Submitted: 2016-01-11
Accepted: 2016-04-21
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Escherichia coli bacteraemias in intensive care unit patients

Magdalena A. Wujtewicz, Anna Śledzińska, Radosław Owczuk, Maria Wujtewicz
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2016.0026
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2016;48(3):171-174.

open access

Vol 48, No 3 (2016)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2016-04-28
Submitted: 2016-01-11
Accepted: 2016-04-21

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although bacterial infections are common in critically ill patients, isolation of bacteria from the sample is not always unambiguous.

The authors addressed Escherichia coli bacteraemia in patients treated in the Intensive Care Unit in the Teaching Hospital in Gdansk in 2002−2009.

METHODS: Using a computer database, the names of Escherichia coli positive patients and dates of blood sampling were found, followed by a retrospective assessment whether positive blood cultures were accompanied by the clinical features of sepsis or asymptomatic bacteraemia.

RESULTS: Positive cultures were found in 40 blood samples (36 patients). Bacteraemia was diagnosed in 11, sepsis in 10, severe sepsis in 6 and septic shock in 13 cases. In the bacteraemia group, the condition originated from the gastrointestinal tract — 4 cases; from the lungs — 1; while in 6 cases, the aetiology was not detected. In patients with an infection, the likely source was the gastrointestinal tract — 12 cases; the lungs — 4; and pyothorax — 2. In 11 cases, the aetiology remained unidentified. In 3 patients in the bacteraemia group, cultures of other microorganisms were found to be positive, while there were 4 cases among the septic patients. In the bacteraemia group, 8 patients died in the intensive care unit, without relation to bacteraemia. Amongst septic patients 17 died, including 12 whose death was probably attributable to Escherichia coli infection.

CONCLUSIONS: Escherichia coli bacteraemias and infections have been and will remain an everyday problem in hospital wards. The differentiation of asymptomatic bacteraemia from infection is essential for rational antibiotic therapy, which is particularly important considering the increasing resistance of microorganisms.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although bacterial infections are common in critically ill patients, isolation of bacteria from the sample is not always unambiguous.

The authors addressed Escherichia coli bacteraemia in patients treated in the Intensive Care Unit in the Teaching Hospital in Gdansk in 2002−2009.

METHODS: Using a computer database, the names of Escherichia coli positive patients and dates of blood sampling were found, followed by a retrospective assessment whether positive blood cultures were accompanied by the clinical features of sepsis or asymptomatic bacteraemia.

RESULTS: Positive cultures were found in 40 blood samples (36 patients). Bacteraemia was diagnosed in 11, sepsis in 10, severe sepsis in 6 and septic shock in 13 cases. In the bacteraemia group, the condition originated from the gastrointestinal tract — 4 cases; from the lungs — 1; while in 6 cases, the aetiology was not detected. In patients with an infection, the likely source was the gastrointestinal tract — 12 cases; the lungs — 4; and pyothorax — 2. In 11 cases, the aetiology remained unidentified. In 3 patients in the bacteraemia group, cultures of other microorganisms were found to be positive, while there were 4 cases among the septic patients. In the bacteraemia group, 8 patients died in the intensive care unit, without relation to bacteraemia. Amongst septic patients 17 died, including 12 whose death was probably attributable to Escherichia coli infection.

CONCLUSIONS: Escherichia coli bacteraemias and infections have been and will remain an everyday problem in hospital wards. The differentiation of asymptomatic bacteraemia from infection is essential for rational antibiotic therapy, which is particularly important considering the increasing resistance of microorganisms.

Get Citation

Keywords

bacteraemia, blood stream infection, Escherichia coli, intensive care unit

About this article
Title

Escherichia coli bacteraemias in intensive care unit patients

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 48, No 3 (2016)

Pages

171-174

Published online

2016-04-28

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2016.0026

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2016;48(3):171-174.

Keywords

bacteraemia
blood stream infection
Escherichia coli
intensive care unit

Authors

Magdalena A. Wujtewicz
Anna Śledzińska
Radosław Owczuk
Maria Wujtewicz

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