open access

Vol 47, No 3 (2015)
Review articles
Submitted: 2015-07-09

Toxic epidermal necrolysis

Joanna Hinc-Kasprzyk, Agnieszka Polak-Krzemińska, Irena Ożóg-Zabolska
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.2015.0037
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2015;47(3):257-262.

open access

Vol 47, No 3 (2015)
Review articles
Submitted: 2015-07-09

Abstract

Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), also known as Lyell’s syndrome, are rare, life- -threatening diseases that are characterised by extensive epidermal detachment, erosion of mucous membranes and severe systemic symptoms. In the majority of cases, the development of symptoms can be attributed to the use of drugs; therefore, the disease pathology is thought to be caused by a severe adverse reaction to drugs. The high mortality rate results primarily from the development of complications in the form of systemic infections and multiple organ failure. TEN and SJS affect all age groups, including newborns, infants and older children. The rarity of these syndromes has not permitted large, randomised studies, which has resulted in numerous difficulties in their diagnosis and management. Because the pathogenesis has not yet been established, the management and systemic treatment of these syndromes have not been standardised. The efficacy of the treatment options suggested has not been confirmed by clinical studies involving suitably large groups of patients, especially children.

Keywords

intensive care, children; toxic epidermal necrolysis, pathogenesis, toxic epidermal necrolysis, treatment, Stevens-Johnson syndrome

About this article
Title

Toxic epidermal necrolysis

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 47, No 3 (2015)

Pages

257-262

DOI

10.5603/AIT.2015.0037

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2015;47(3):257-262.

Keywords

intensive care
children
toxic epidermal necrolysis
pathogenesis
toxic epidermal necrolysis
treatment
Stevens-Johnson syndrome

Authors

Joanna Hinc-Kasprzyk
Agnieszka Polak-Krzemińska
Irena Ożóg-Zabolska

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