open access

Vol 46, No 1 (2014 Jan-Mar)
Original and clinical articles
Submitted: 2014-03-11
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Intrathecal morphine increases the incidence of urinary retention in orthopaedic patients under spinal anaesthesia

Dariusz Tomaszewski, Mariusz Bałkota, Andrzej Truszczyński, Adam Machowicz
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.2014.0006
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2014;46(1):29-33.

open access

Vol 46, No 1 (2014 Jan-Mar)
Original and clinical articles
Submitted: 2014-03-11

Abstract

Background: Morphine injected into the subarachnoid space enhances the analgesic effects of spinal anaesthesia, improving the patient’s comfort in the postoperative period. However, it is likely to be associated with adverse side effects that reduce patient satisfaction, e.g., urine retention. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of urine retention in patients receiving spinal anaesthesia combined with intrathecal morphine.

Methods: The postoperative course of 30 patients undergoing orthopaedic surgical procedures was analysed. Patients were divided into two groups: the control group (BSH; 16 individuals anaesthetised with a 0.5% hyperbaric solution of bupivacaine) and the experimental group (BSH + MF; 14 individuals anaesthetised with a 0.5% hyperbaric solution of bupivacaine with the addition of 0.2 mg morphine). The following parameters were analysed: duration of anaesthesia, time to miction, time to urgency and need to introduce a urinary catheter.

Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the duration of anaesthesia, incidence of hypogastric discomfort/difficulties in urination, time to hypogastric discomfort or duration of discomfort. Patients receiving intrathecal morphine were characterised by longer time to miction, higher incidence of urinary catheterisation and longer time between anaesthesia and urinary catheterisation.

Conclusions: Patients receiving spinal anaesthesia with a 0.5% hyperbaric solution of bupivacaine combined with intrathecal morphine were demonstrated to have a higher incidence of urinary catheterisation, longer time to urinary catheterisation and longer time to miction compared to patients receiving only local anaesthetics.

Abstract

Background: Morphine injected into the subarachnoid space enhances the analgesic effects of spinal anaesthesia, improving the patient’s comfort in the postoperative period. However, it is likely to be associated with adverse side effects that reduce patient satisfaction, e.g., urine retention. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of urine retention in patients receiving spinal anaesthesia combined with intrathecal morphine.

Methods: The postoperative course of 30 patients undergoing orthopaedic surgical procedures was analysed. Patients were divided into two groups: the control group (BSH; 16 individuals anaesthetised with a 0.5% hyperbaric solution of bupivacaine) and the experimental group (BSH + MF; 14 individuals anaesthetised with a 0.5% hyperbaric solution of bupivacaine with the addition of 0.2 mg morphine). The following parameters were analysed: duration of anaesthesia, time to miction, time to urgency and need to introduce a urinary catheter.

Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the duration of anaesthesia, incidence of hypogastric discomfort/difficulties in urination, time to hypogastric discomfort or duration of discomfort. Patients receiving intrathecal morphine were characterised by longer time to miction, higher incidence of urinary catheterisation and longer time between anaesthesia and urinary catheterisation.

Conclusions: Patients receiving spinal anaesthesia with a 0.5% hyperbaric solution of bupivacaine combined with intrathecal morphine were demonstrated to have a higher incidence of urinary catheterisation, longer time to urinary catheterisation and longer time to miction compared to patients receiving only local anaesthetics.

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Keywords

spinal anaesthesia, complications, urine retention; spinal anaesthesia, adjuvants, morphine

About this article
Title

Intrathecal morphine increases the incidence of urinary retention in orthopaedic patients under spinal anaesthesia

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 46, No 1 (2014 Jan-Mar)

Pages

29-33

DOI

10.5603/AIT.2014.0006

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2014;46(1):29-33.

Keywords

spinal anaesthesia
complications
urine retention
spinal anaesthesia
adjuvants
morphine

Authors

Dariusz Tomaszewski
Mariusz Bałkota
Andrzej Truszczyński
Adam Machowicz

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