open access

Vol 46, No 1 (2014 Jan-Mar)
Original and clinical articles
Submitted: 2014-03-11
Get Citation

Effect of oral gabapentin on haemodynamic variables during microlaryngoscopic surgery

Vida Ayatollahi, Parvane Mirshamsi, Shekoufeh Behdad, Mehdi Amirdosara, Sedighe Vaziribozorg
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.2014.0004
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2014;46(1):17-22.

open access

Vol 46, No 1 (2014 Jan-Mar)
Original and clinical articles
Submitted: 2014-03-11

Abstract

Background: Manipulation of the larynx, such as laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation, is associated with haemodynamic and cardiovascular responses. In microlaryngoscopic procedures, these responses are more severe than laryngoscopy for endotracheal intubation because in microlaryngoscopic surgeries laryngoscope fixes for a longer time (15–20 minutes compared to 15–30 seconds in tracheal intubation). This study was performed to evaluate the effect of 800 mg oral gabapentin on the haemodynamic variables during microlaryngoscopic surgery.

Methods: 30 patients aged 30–70 years, ASA physical status I or II, who underwent microlaryngeal surgery were included to the study. The night before surgery, 15 patients (group G) received 100 mg gabapentin and 15 patients (group P) received a placebo. Ninety minutes before the operation, they either received 800 mg gabapentin (group G), or received a placebo (group P).

Results: Heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure were measured on the night before the procedure, the morning before the procedure, at arrival to the operating room as baseline, before and after induction, 1, 3 min after tracheal intubation, 1, 5, 15, 25 min after fixing laryngoscope, before laryngoscope removal, and 1 min after that. Analyses revealed that the systolic blood pressure was lower in group G after induction, 1 and 5 min after fixing laryngoscope and before removing the laryngoscope. Diastolic blood pressure in group G was lower at the time of arriving in the operating room, after induction, 1 min after fixing surgical laryngoscope and before removing the laryngoscope. Mean arterial pressure behaved similarly, and additionally it was lower at 5 min after fixing the laryngoscope. Heart rate was reduced at the time after induction, 1, 3 min after intubation, 5 min after fixing the laryngoscope and before laryngoscope removal in group G. Overall, in the group G, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure were lower in the first 15 min after microlaryngoscopy compared to group P but there was no difference in mean systolic blood pressure and mean heart rate.

Conclusion: 800 mg oral gabapentin given 90 min before a procedure attenuates the rise of diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial blood pressure in the first 15 min after microlaryngoscopy surgery, but has no effect on systolic blood pressure or heart rate.

Abstract

Background: Manipulation of the larynx, such as laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation, is associated with haemodynamic and cardiovascular responses. In microlaryngoscopic procedures, these responses are more severe than laryngoscopy for endotracheal intubation because in microlaryngoscopic surgeries laryngoscope fixes for a longer time (15–20 minutes compared to 15–30 seconds in tracheal intubation). This study was performed to evaluate the effect of 800 mg oral gabapentin on the haemodynamic variables during microlaryngoscopic surgery.

Methods: 30 patients aged 30–70 years, ASA physical status I or II, who underwent microlaryngeal surgery were included to the study. The night before surgery, 15 patients (group G) received 100 mg gabapentin and 15 patients (group P) received a placebo. Ninety minutes before the operation, they either received 800 mg gabapentin (group G), or received a placebo (group P).

Results: Heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure were measured on the night before the procedure, the morning before the procedure, at arrival to the operating room as baseline, before and after induction, 1, 3 min after tracheal intubation, 1, 5, 15, 25 min after fixing laryngoscope, before laryngoscope removal, and 1 min after that. Analyses revealed that the systolic blood pressure was lower in group G after induction, 1 and 5 min after fixing laryngoscope and before removing the laryngoscope. Diastolic blood pressure in group G was lower at the time of arriving in the operating room, after induction, 1 min after fixing surgical laryngoscope and before removing the laryngoscope. Mean arterial pressure behaved similarly, and additionally it was lower at 5 min after fixing the laryngoscope. Heart rate was reduced at the time after induction, 1, 3 min after intubation, 5 min after fixing the laryngoscope and before laryngoscope removal in group G. Overall, in the group G, diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure were lower in the first 15 min after microlaryngoscopy compared to group P but there was no difference in mean systolic blood pressure and mean heart rate.

Conclusion: 800 mg oral gabapentin given 90 min before a procedure attenuates the rise of diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial blood pressure in the first 15 min after microlaryngoscopy surgery, but has no effect on systolic blood pressure or heart rate.

Get Citation

Keywords

microlaryngoscopy, haemodynamic response, attenuation, gabapentin

About this article
Title

Effect of oral gabapentin on haemodynamic variables during microlaryngoscopic surgery

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 46, No 1 (2014 Jan-Mar)

Pages

17-22

DOI

10.5603/AIT.2014.0004

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2014;46(1):17-22.

Keywords

microlaryngoscopy
haemodynamic response
attenuation
gabapentin

Authors

Vida Ayatollahi
Parvane Mirshamsi
Shekoufeh Behdad
Mehdi Amirdosara
Sedighe Vaziribozorg

Important: This website uses cookies.tanya dokter More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

VM Media sp. z o.o. VM Group sp.k., Grupa Via Medica, Świętokrzyska 73 St., 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl