open access

Vol 44, No 1 (2012 Jan-Mar)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2012-03-30
Submitted: 2012-03-30
Accepted: 2012-03-30
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Analysis of intraoperative transfusions of red blood cell concentrates in adults

Wioletta Sawicka, Radosław Owczuk, Magdalena A. Wujtewicz, Stanisław Hać, Maria Wujtewicz
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2012;44(1):8-11.

open access

Vol 44, No 1 (2012 Jan-Mar)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2012-03-30
Submitted: 2012-03-30
Accepted: 2012-03-30

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates is the most common allogeneic transplantation. The aim of the study was to analyse the indications for RBC transfusions, compared to the estimated intraoperative blood loss and the actual requirements for blood transfusion.

METHODS: We retrospectively analysed the files of 250 adult patients who were transfused over the year 2006, during various general, oncologic, trauma, vascular, plastic and thoracic surgical procedures. Preoperative screening was done in a hospital laboratory, whereas postoperative haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit were assessed at the bedside using a co-oximeter.

RESULTS: The majority of RBC transfusions were started at relatively high haemoglobin concentrations (mean 5.6 mmol L-1), contrary to the current guidelines. A high correlation coefficient (r=0.82) was found between the estimated blood loss and the volume of RBCs transfused; therefore we concluded that the observed blood loss was the main factor in transfusion decisions.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite enormous progress in transfusion science, the current practice in our institution is still far from ideal; RBCs are frequently transfused too early and without a real indication.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates is the most common allogeneic transplantation. The aim of the study was to analyse the indications for RBC transfusions, compared to the estimated intraoperative blood loss and the actual requirements for blood transfusion.

METHODS: We retrospectively analysed the files of 250 adult patients who were transfused over the year 2006, during various general, oncologic, trauma, vascular, plastic and thoracic surgical procedures. Preoperative screening was done in a hospital laboratory, whereas postoperative haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit were assessed at the bedside using a co-oximeter.

RESULTS: The majority of RBC transfusions were started at relatively high haemoglobin concentrations (mean 5.6 mmol L-1), contrary to the current guidelines. A high correlation coefficient (r=0.82) was found between the estimated blood loss and the volume of RBCs transfused; therefore we concluded that the observed blood loss was the main factor in transfusion decisions.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite enormous progress in transfusion science, the current practice in our institution is still far from ideal; RBCs are frequently transfused too early and without a real indication.

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Keywords

blood, red blood cell concentrate; blood, transfusion

About this article
Title

Analysis of intraoperative transfusions of red blood cell concentrates in adults

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 44, No 1 (2012 Jan-Mar)

Pages

8-11

Published online

2012-03-30

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2012;44(1):8-11.

Keywords

blood
red blood cell concentrate
blood
transfusion

Authors

Wioletta Sawicka
Radosław Owczuk
Magdalena A. Wujtewicz
Stanisław Hać
Maria Wujtewicz

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