open access

Vol 88, No 3 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-07-18
Submitted: 2019-12-28
Accepted: 2020-03-15
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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with a higher level of serum uric acid. A systematic review and meta-analysis

Phuuwadith Wattanachayakul, Pongprueth Rujirachun, Nipith Charoenngam, Patompong Ungprasert
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.2020.0119
·
Pubmed: 32706105
·
Adv Respir Med 2020;88(3):215-222.

open access

Vol 88, No 3 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-07-18
Submitted: 2019-12-28
Accepted: 2020-03-15

Abstract

Introduction: Recent studies have suggested that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may have a higher level of serum uric acid compared with individuals without COPD, although the data are still limited. The current systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to summarize all available data.
Material and methods: A systematic review was performed using the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from their inception to July 2019. Studies that were eligible for the meta-analysis must have consisted of two groups of participants, patients with COPD and individuals without COPD. The eligible studies must have reported either mean or median level of serum uric acid and its standard deviation (SD) or interquartile range of participants in both groups. Mean serum uric acid level and SD of participants in both groups were extracted from each study and the mean difference (MD) was calculated. Pooled MD was then computed by combining MDs of each study using random effects model.
Results: A total of eight studies with 1,612 participants met the eligibility criteria and were included in the data analysis. The serum uric acid level among patients with COPD was significantly higher than individuals without COPD with the pooled MD of 0.91 mg/dL (95% CI: 0.45–1.38; I2 = 89%).
Conclusions: The current study found a significantly higher level of serum uric acid among patients with COPD than individuals without COPD.

Abstract

Introduction: Recent studies have suggested that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may have a higher level of serum uric acid compared with individuals without COPD, although the data are still limited. The current systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to summarize all available data.
Material and methods: A systematic review was performed using the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from their inception to July 2019. Studies that were eligible for the meta-analysis must have consisted of two groups of participants, patients with COPD and individuals without COPD. The eligible studies must have reported either mean or median level of serum uric acid and its standard deviation (SD) or interquartile range of participants in both groups. Mean serum uric acid level and SD of participants in both groups were extracted from each study and the mean difference (MD) was calculated. Pooled MD was then computed by combining MDs of each study using random effects model.
Results: A total of eight studies with 1,612 participants met the eligibility criteria and were included in the data analysis. The serum uric acid level among patients with COPD was significantly higher than individuals without COPD with the pooled MD of 0.91 mg/dL (95% CI: 0.45–1.38; I2 = 89%).
Conclusions: The current study found a significantly higher level of serum uric acid among patients with COPD than individuals without COPD.

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Keywords

chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; serum uric acid; meta-analysis

Supplementary Files (3)
supplementary data 2 ; PRISMA statement
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supplementary data1; Search Strategy
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Table 1 Baseline characteristics of studies included in the meta-analysis
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About this article
Title

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with a higher level of serum uric acid. A systematic review and meta-analysis

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 88, No 3 (2020)

Pages

215-222

Published online

2020-07-18

DOI

10.5603/ARM.2020.0119

Pubmed

32706105

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2020;88(3):215-222.

Keywords

chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
serum uric acid
meta-analysis

Authors

Phuuwadith Wattanachayakul
Pongprueth Rujirachun
Nipith Charoenngam
Patompong Ungprasert

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