open access

Vol 88, No 1 (2020)
Research paper
Published online: 2020-02-28
Submitted: 2019-08-18
Accepted: 2020-01-13
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Screening diabetes mellitus patients for tuberculosis in Southern Nigeria: A pilot study

Ngozi Ekeke, Elias Aniwada, Joseph Chukwu, Charles Nwafor, Anthony Meka, Alphonsus Chukwuka, Okechukwu Ezeakile, Adeyemi Ajayi, Festus Soyinka, Francis Bakpa, Victoria Uwanuruochi, Ezechukwu Aniekwensi, Chinwe Eze
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.2020.0072
·
Pubmed: 32153002
·
Adv Respir Med 2020;88(1):6-12.

open access

Vol 88, No 1 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-02-28
Submitted: 2019-08-18
Accepted: 2020-01-13

Abstract

Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM) and tuberculosis (TB) are of great public health importance globally, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. Tuberculosis is the third cause of death among subjects with non-communicable diseases. DM increases risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis. The study aimed to ascertain yield of TB cases and the number needed to screen (NNS) among DM patients.
Material and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at 10 health facilities with high DM patient load and readily accessible DOTS center in 6 states of southern region of Nigeria over a period of 6 months under routine programme conditions. All patients who gave consent were included in the study. Yield and NNS were calculated using an appropriate formula. Results: 3 457 patients were screened with a mean age (SD) of 59.9 (12.9) years. The majority were male, 2 277 (65.9%). Overall prevalence of TB was 0.8% (800 per 100 000). Sixteen (0.5%) were known TB cases (old cases). There were 221 presumptive cases (6.4%) out of which 184 (83.3%) were sent for Xpert MTB/Rif assay. Eleven (0.3%) new cases of TB were detected, giving additional yield of 40.7% and the number needed to screen (NNS) of 315. All the 11 patients were placed on anti-TB treatment. Conclusions: The prevalence of TB among DM patients was higher than in the general population. The yield was also good and comparable to other findings. This underscores the need for institute active screening for TB among DM patients. Further stu-dies are recommended to identify associated factors to guide policy makers in planning and development of TB-DM integrated services.

Abstract

Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM) and tuberculosis (TB) are of great public health importance globally, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. Tuberculosis is the third cause of death among subjects with non-communicable diseases. DM increases risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis. The study aimed to ascertain yield of TB cases and the number needed to screen (NNS) among DM patients.
Material and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at 10 health facilities with high DM patient load and readily accessible DOTS center in 6 states of southern region of Nigeria over a period of 6 months under routine programme conditions. All patients who gave consent were included in the study. Yield and NNS were calculated using an appropriate formula. Results: 3 457 patients were screened with a mean age (SD) of 59.9 (12.9) years. The majority were male, 2 277 (65.9%). Overall prevalence of TB was 0.8% (800 per 100 000). Sixteen (0.5%) were known TB cases (old cases). There were 221 presumptive cases (6.4%) out of which 184 (83.3%) were sent for Xpert MTB/Rif assay. Eleven (0.3%) new cases of TB were detected, giving additional yield of 40.7% and the number needed to screen (NNS) of 315. All the 11 patients were placed on anti-TB treatment. Conclusions: The prevalence of TB among DM patients was higher than in the general population. The yield was also good and comparable to other findings. This underscores the need for institute active screening for TB among DM patients. Further stu-dies are recommended to identify associated factors to guide policy makers in planning and development of TB-DM integrated services.

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Keywords

diabetes; tuberculosis; screening; yield; number needed to be screened; Nigeriaa

About this article
Title

Screening diabetes mellitus patients for tuberculosis in Southern Nigeria: A pilot study

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 88, No 1 (2020)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

6-12

Published online

2020-02-28

DOI

10.5603/ARM.2020.0072

Pubmed

32153002

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2020;88(1):6-12.

Keywords

diabetes
tuberculosis
screening
yield
number needed to be screened
Nigeriaa

Authors

Ngozi Ekeke
Elias Aniwada
Joseph Chukwu
Charles Nwafor
Anthony Meka
Alphonsus Chukwuka
Okechukwu Ezeakile
Adeyemi Ajayi
Festus Soyinka
Francis Bakpa
Victoria Uwanuruochi
Ezechukwu Aniekwensi
Chinwe Eze

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