open access

Vol 87, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-06-28
Submitted: 2018-12-29
Accepted: 2019-04-24
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Predictors of airway hyperreactivity in house dust mite allergic patients

Agnieszka Pampuch, Robert Milewski, Agata Rogowska, Krzysztof Kowal
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.2019.0025
·
Pubmed: 31282556
·
Adv Respir Med 2019;87(3):152-158.

open access

Vol 87, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-06-28
Submitted: 2018-12-29
Accepted: 2019-04-24

Abstract

Introduction: Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a cardinal feature of asthma. Asthma is a heterogenous disorder which consists of different phenotypes and endotypes. Mechanisms leading to AHR may differ in different asthma subtypes. Allergy to perennial allergens, including house dust mites (HDM) is a major risk factor for asthma development. The aim of this study was to determine predictors of AHR in a well-characterized population of HDM-allergic patients.
Material and methods: In a retrospective analysis 843 patients with HDM-allergic rhinitis with/without asthma were evaluated. The following parameters were included in the analysis: serum concentration of total (t)- and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp)-specific IgE, fractional exhaled nitric oxide concentration (FeNO), lung function tests, bronchial challenge with histamine, age sex, and body mass index (BMI). Linear regression analysis was used to determine predictors of AHR.
Results: In a simple linear regression analysis baseline lung function results expressed as either forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) or maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the forced vital capacity (MEF50), FeNO, tIgE, DpIgE, age and BMI affected AHR. A multiple regression analysis demonstrated that in the whole group of HDM-allergic patients the most important, independent predictors of AHR were MEF50, FeNO and DpIgE.
Conclusion: Even in a well-characterized asthma phenotype several processes participate in development of AHR. Major, independent predictors of AHR: lung function parameters, FeNO and DpIgE indicate possible targets for therapeutic intervention in a population of HDM-allergic patients.

Abstract

Introduction: Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a cardinal feature of asthma. Asthma is a heterogenous disorder which consists of different phenotypes and endotypes. Mechanisms leading to AHR may differ in different asthma subtypes. Allergy to perennial allergens, including house dust mites (HDM) is a major risk factor for asthma development. The aim of this study was to determine predictors of AHR in a well-characterized population of HDM-allergic patients.
Material and methods: In a retrospective analysis 843 patients with HDM-allergic rhinitis with/without asthma were evaluated. The following parameters were included in the analysis: serum concentration of total (t)- and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp)-specific IgE, fractional exhaled nitric oxide concentration (FeNO), lung function tests, bronchial challenge with histamine, age sex, and body mass index (BMI). Linear regression analysis was used to determine predictors of AHR.
Results: In a simple linear regression analysis baseline lung function results expressed as either forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) or maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the forced vital capacity (MEF50), FeNO, tIgE, DpIgE, age and BMI affected AHR. A multiple regression analysis demonstrated that in the whole group of HDM-allergic patients the most important, independent predictors of AHR were MEF50, FeNO and DpIgE.
Conclusion: Even in a well-characterized asthma phenotype several processes participate in development of AHR. Major, independent predictors of AHR: lung function parameters, FeNO and DpIgE indicate possible targets for therapeutic intervention in a population of HDM-allergic patients.

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Keywords

airway hyperresponsiveness; asthma; house dust mite; nitric oxide; IgE

About this article
Title

Predictors of airway hyperreactivity in house dust mite allergic patients

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 87, No 3 (2019)

Pages

152-158

Published online

2019-06-28

DOI

10.5603/ARM.2019.0025

Pubmed

31282556

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2019;87(3):152-158.

Keywords

airway hyperresponsiveness
asthma
house dust mite
nitric oxide
IgE

Authors

Agnieszka Pampuch
Robert Milewski
Agata Rogowska
Krzysztof Kowal

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