open access

Vol 87, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-06-28
Submitted: 2018-11-12
Accepted: 2019-05-03
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The effectiveness of relaxation training in the quality of life and anxiety of patients with asthma

Guitti Pourdowlat, Roghyeh Hejrati, Somayeh Lookzadeh
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.2019.0024
·
Pubmed: 31282555
·
Adv Respir Med 2019;87(3):146-151.

open access

Vol 87, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-06-28
Submitted: 2018-11-12
Accepted: 2019-05-03

Abstract

Introduction: With a 5–10% global prevalence, asthma, as a chronic condition which can strongly affect the quality of life of patients and care givers, needs comprehensive approach, including medications and psychological techniques, to get the optimal control. This is why the current study aimed to assess the effectiveness of the Papworth method relaxation training among patients with asthma, considering reduced anxiety and improved quality of life.
Material and methods: Through a randomized controlled trial, 30 patients with asthma 20–45 years of age referring to a tertiary university hospital in Tehran enrolled two study groups, including disease cases and controls. The Papworth method of relaxation was used and was finally assessed for its effectiveness by two questionnaires, namely STAI for anxiety and SF-36 for the quality of life. Pre-test and post-test were done for both groups.
Results: The scores of the anxiety questionnaire (STAI) before and after the intervention were significantly different, and the mean scores obviously reduced after relaxation training among cases from 102.6 to 79.5. The scores of the QOL grew clearly after relaxation training in the case group from 308.07 to 546.6.
Conclusions: As an accessory helpful treatment, relaxation training Papworth method sounds to be perfectly able to control stressful conditions in patients with asthma to prevent disease attacks and improve the quality of life. So, psychological teams can be advised to referral centers for asthma in the relevant clinics to help people get training in this regard.

Abstract

Introduction: With a 5–10% global prevalence, asthma, as a chronic condition which can strongly affect the quality of life of patients and care givers, needs comprehensive approach, including medications and psychological techniques, to get the optimal control. This is why the current study aimed to assess the effectiveness of the Papworth method relaxation training among patients with asthma, considering reduced anxiety and improved quality of life.
Material and methods: Through a randomized controlled trial, 30 patients with asthma 20–45 years of age referring to a tertiary university hospital in Tehran enrolled two study groups, including disease cases and controls. The Papworth method of relaxation was used and was finally assessed for its effectiveness by two questionnaires, namely STAI for anxiety and SF-36 for the quality of life. Pre-test and post-test were done for both groups.
Results: The scores of the anxiety questionnaire (STAI) before and after the intervention were significantly different, and the mean scores obviously reduced after relaxation training among cases from 102.6 to 79.5. The scores of the QOL grew clearly after relaxation training in the case group from 308.07 to 546.6.
Conclusions: As an accessory helpful treatment, relaxation training Papworth method sounds to be perfectly able to control stressful conditions in patients with asthma to prevent disease attacks and improve the quality of life. So, psychological teams can be advised to referral centers for asthma in the relevant clinics to help people get training in this regard.

Get Citation

Keywords

asthma, relaxation training, quality of life, anxiety, SF-36 questionnaire

About this article
Title

The effectiveness of relaxation training in the quality of life and anxiety of patients with asthma

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 87, No 3 (2019)

Pages

146-151

Published online

2019-06-28

DOI

10.5603/ARM.2019.0024

Pubmed

31282555

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2019;87(3):146-151.

Keywords

asthma
relaxation training
quality of life
anxiety
SF-36 questionnaire

Authors

Guitti Pourdowlat
Roghyeh Hejrati
Somayeh Lookzadeh

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