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Ahead of Print
Research paper
Submitted: 2021-04-05
Accepted: 2021-05-23
Published online: 2021-11-25
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Effects of individualized target setting on step count in Japanese patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a pilot study

Seigo Sasaki1, Yoshiaki Minakata1, Yuichiro Azuma1, Takahiro Kaki1, Kazumi Kawabe1, Hideya Ono1
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2021.0080
Affiliations
  1. Department of Respiratory Medicine, National Hospital Organization Wakayama Hospital

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2021-04-05
Accepted: 2021-05-23
Published online: 2021-11-25

Abstract

Introduction: Improving physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a very important issue; however, effective recommended targets for individual patients remain to be determined.
Material and methods: We developed a method for setting a target value for the step count for each patient using a measured value and the predicted step count. We then evaluated the effect of providing a pedometer or a pedometer with this target value for eight weeks on the step count in patients with COPD.
Results: Sixteen stable COPD patients were included in the analysis. Overall, no significant increase in the step count was obtained by providing the target value; however, when the patients were divided into two groups based on the median step count at baseline, a significant increase in the step count was observed in the low step-count group. In both the overall population and the low step-count group, there was a significant increase in the target achievement rate in patients who received a pedometer with a target value in comparison to patients who were given a pedometer without a target value.
Conclusions: Physical activity may be improved by providing a newly developed individual target step count to COPD patients with a low step count at baseline.

Abstract

Introduction: Improving physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a very important issue; however, effective recommended targets for individual patients remain to be determined.
Material and methods: We developed a method for setting a target value for the step count for each patient using a measured value and the predicted step count. We then evaluated the effect of providing a pedometer or a pedometer with this target value for eight weeks on the step count in patients with COPD.
Results: Sixteen stable COPD patients were included in the analysis. Overall, no significant increase in the step count was obtained by providing the target value; however, when the patients were divided into two groups based on the median step count at baseline, a significant increase in the step count was observed in the low step-count group. In both the overall population and the low step-count group, there was a significant increase in the target achievement rate in patients who received a pedometer with a target value in comparison to patients who were given a pedometer without a target value.
Conclusions: Physical activity may be improved by providing a newly developed individual target step count to COPD patients with a low step count at baseline.

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Keywords

physical activity, step count, target value

About this article
Title

Effects of individualized target setting on step count in Japanese patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a pilot study

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2021-11-25

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2021.0080

Keywords

physical activity
step count
target value

Authors

Seigo Sasaki
Yoshiaki Minakata
Yuichiro Azuma
Takahiro Kaki
Kazumi Kawabe
Hideya Ono

References (31)
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