open access

Vol 89, No 5 (2021)
Research paper
Submitted: 2021-03-08
Accepted: 2021-04-12
Published online: 2021-09-28
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Persistence of post-COVID lung parenchymal abnormalities during the three-month follow-up

Ali Bin Sarwar Zubairi1, Anjiya Shaikh2, Syed Muhammad Zubair1, Akbar Shoukat Ali1, Safia Awan1, Muhammad Irfan1
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2021.0090
·
Pubmed: 34612504
·
Adv Respir Med 2021;89(5):477-483.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan
  2. Medical College, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan

open access

Vol 89, No 5 (2021)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2021-03-08
Accepted: 2021-04-12
Published online: 2021-09-28

Abstract

Introduction: COVID-19-associated pulmonary sequalae have been increasingly reported after recovery from acute infection.
Therefore, we aim to explore the charactersitics of persistent lung parenchymal abnormalities in patients with COVID-19.
Material and methods: An observational study was conducted in patients with post-COVID lung parenchymal abnormalities
from April till September 2020. Patients ≥18 years of age with COVID-19 who were diagnosed as post-COVID lung parenchymal abnormality based on respiratory symptoms and HRCT chest imaging after the recovery of acute infection. Data was recorded on a structured pro forma, and descriptive analysis was performed using Stata version 12.1.
Results: A total of 30 patients with post-COVID lung parenchymal abnormalities were identified. The mean age of patients was 59.1 (SD 12.6), and 27 (90.0%) were males. Four HRCT patterns of lung parenchymal abnormalities were seen; organizing pneumonia in 10 (33.3%), nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis in 17 (56.7%), usual interstitial pneumonitis in 12 (40.0%) and probable usual interstitial pneumonitis in 14 (46.7%). Diffuse involvement was found in 15 (50.0%) patients, while peripheral predominance in 15 (50.0%), and other significant findings were seen in 8 (26.7%) patients. All individuals were treated with corticosteroids. The case fatality rate was 16.7%. Amongst the survivors, 32.0% recovered completely, 36.0% improved, while 32.0% of the patients had static or progressive disease.
Conclusion: This is the first study from Southeast Asia that identified post-COVID lung parenchymal abnormalities in patients who had no pre-existing lung disease highlighting the importance of timely recognition and treatment of this entity that might lead to fatal outcome.

Abstract

Introduction: COVID-19-associated pulmonary sequalae have been increasingly reported after recovery from acute infection.
Therefore, we aim to explore the charactersitics of persistent lung parenchymal abnormalities in patients with COVID-19.
Material and methods: An observational study was conducted in patients with post-COVID lung parenchymal abnormalities
from April till September 2020. Patients ≥18 years of age with COVID-19 who were diagnosed as post-COVID lung parenchymal abnormality based on respiratory symptoms and HRCT chest imaging after the recovery of acute infection. Data was recorded on a structured pro forma, and descriptive analysis was performed using Stata version 12.1.
Results: A total of 30 patients with post-COVID lung parenchymal abnormalities were identified. The mean age of patients was 59.1 (SD 12.6), and 27 (90.0%) were males. Four HRCT patterns of lung parenchymal abnormalities were seen; organizing pneumonia in 10 (33.3%), nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis in 17 (56.7%), usual interstitial pneumonitis in 12 (40.0%) and probable usual interstitial pneumonitis in 14 (46.7%). Diffuse involvement was found in 15 (50.0%) patients, while peripheral predominance in 15 (50.0%), and other significant findings were seen in 8 (26.7%) patients. All individuals were treated with corticosteroids. The case fatality rate was 16.7%. Amongst the survivors, 32.0% recovered completely, 36.0% improved, while 32.0% of the patients had static or progressive disease.
Conclusion: This is the first study from Southeast Asia that identified post-COVID lung parenchymal abnormalities in patients who had no pre-existing lung disease highlighting the importance of timely recognition and treatment of this entity that might lead to fatal outcome.

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Keywords

COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, pulmonary sequelae, lung parenchymal abnormalities

About this article
Title

Persistence of post-COVID lung parenchymal abnormalities during the three-month follow-up

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 89, No 5 (2021)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

477-483

Published online

2021-09-28

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2021.0090

Pubmed

34612504

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2021;89(5):477-483.

Keywords

COVID-19
SARS-CoV-2
pulmonary sequelae
lung parenchymal abnormalities

Authors

Ali Bin Sarwar Zubairi
Anjiya Shaikh
Syed Muhammad Zubair
Akbar Shoukat Ali
Safia Awan
Muhammad Irfan

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