open access

Vol 89, No 2 (2021)
Research paper
Published online: 2021-04-30
Submitted: 2020-12-28
Accepted: 2021-02-12
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A clinical profile and factors associated with severity of the disease among Polish patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 — an observational study

Tomasz Stachura, Natalia Celejewska-Wójcik, Kamil Polok, Karolina Górka, Sabina Lichołai, Krzysztof Wójcik, Jacek Krawczyk, Anna Kozłowska, Marek Przybyszowski, Tomasz Włoch, Jacek Górka, Krzysztof Sładek
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2021.0035
·
Pubmed: 33966260
·
Adv Respir Med 2021;89(2):124-134.

open access

Vol 89, No 2 (2021)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2021-04-30
Submitted: 2020-12-28
Accepted: 2021-02-12

Abstract

Introduction: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is one of the greatest clinical challenges of the last decades. Clinical factors associated with severity of the disease remain unclear. The aim of the study was to characterize Polish patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 and to evaluate potential prognostic factors of severe course of the disease.
Material and methods: An observational study was conducted from March to July 2020 in the Pulmonology and Allergology Department of the University Hospital in Kraków, Poland. Consecutive patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) infection were enrolled, and data about past medical history, signs and symptoms, laboratory results, imaging studies results, in-hospital management and outcomes was prospectively gathered.
Results: The study sample comprised 100 patients at the mean age of 59.2 (SD 16.1) years among whom 63 (63.0%) were male. Among them 10 (10.0%) died, 47 (47%) presented respiratory failure, 15 (15.0%) were transferred to the intensive care unit, 17 (17.0%) developed acute kidney injury, 7 (7.0%) had sepsis and 10 (10.0%) were diagnosed with pulmonary embolism. Multivariable analysis revealed age (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.01–1.15), body mass index (BMI; OR 1.24; 95% CI 1.01–1.53), modified early warning score (MEWS; OR 3.95; 95% CI 1.48–12), the highest d-dimer value (OR 1.73; 95% CI 1.03–2.9) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; OR 1.16; 95% CI 1.03–1.3) to be associated with severe course of COVID-19.
Conclusion: This observational study showed that almost half of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 developed respiratory failure in the course of the disease. Increasing age, BMI, MEWS, d-dimer value and LDH concentration were associated with the severity of COVID-19.

Abstract

Introduction: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is one of the greatest clinical challenges of the last decades. Clinical factors associated with severity of the disease remain unclear. The aim of the study was to characterize Polish patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 and to evaluate potential prognostic factors of severe course of the disease.
Material and methods: An observational study was conducted from March to July 2020 in the Pulmonology and Allergology Department of the University Hospital in Kraków, Poland. Consecutive patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) infection were enrolled, and data about past medical history, signs and symptoms, laboratory results, imaging studies results, in-hospital management and outcomes was prospectively gathered.
Results: The study sample comprised 100 patients at the mean age of 59.2 (SD 16.1) years among whom 63 (63.0%) were male. Among them 10 (10.0%) died, 47 (47%) presented respiratory failure, 15 (15.0%) were transferred to the intensive care unit, 17 (17.0%) developed acute kidney injury, 7 (7.0%) had sepsis and 10 (10.0%) were diagnosed with pulmonary embolism. Multivariable analysis revealed age (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.01–1.15), body mass index (BMI; OR 1.24; 95% CI 1.01–1.53), modified early warning score (MEWS; OR 3.95; 95% CI 1.48–12), the highest d-dimer value (OR 1.73; 95% CI 1.03–2.9) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; OR 1.16; 95% CI 1.03–1.3) to be associated with severe course of COVID-19.
Conclusion: This observational study showed that almost half of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 developed respiratory failure in the course of the disease. Increasing age, BMI, MEWS, d-dimer value and LDH concentration were associated with the severity of COVID-19.

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Keywords

clinical characteristics; coronavirus disease 2019; respiratory failure; risk factors; SARS-CoV-2

About this article
Title

A clinical profile and factors associated with severity of the disease among Polish patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 — an observational study

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 89, No 2 (2021)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

124-134

Published online

2021-04-30

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2021.0035

Pubmed

33966260

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2021;89(2):124-134.

Keywords

clinical characteristics
coronavirus disease 2019
respiratory failure
risk factors
SARS-CoV-2

Authors

Tomasz Stachura
Natalia Celejewska-Wójcik
Kamil Polok
Karolina Górka
Sabina Lichołai
Krzysztof Wójcik
Jacek Krawczyk
Anna Kozłowska
Marek Przybyszowski
Tomasz Włoch
Jacek Górka
Krzysztof Sładek

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