open access

Vol 89, No 2 (2021)
Review paper
Published online: 2021-04-30
Submitted: 2020-12-15
Accepted: 2021-02-04
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The role of screening questionnaires in the assessment of risk and severity of obstructive sleep apnea — polysomnography versus polygraphy

Aleksandra Małolepsza, Aleksandra Kudrycka, Urszula Karwowska, Tetsuro Hoshino, Erik Wibowo, Péter Pál Böjti, Adam Białas, Wojciech Kuczyński
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2021.0038
·
Pubmed: 33966264
·
Adv Respir Med 2021;89(2):188-196.

open access

Vol 89, No 2 (2021)
REVIEWS
Published online: 2021-04-30
Submitted: 2020-12-15
Accepted: 2021-02-04

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disease of significant importance, which may lead to numerous severe clinical consequences. The gold standard in the diagnosis of this sleep-related breathing disorder (SRBD) is polysomnography (PSG). However, due to the need for high expertise of staff who perform this procedure, its complexity, and relatively low availability, some simpler substitutes have been developed; among them is polygraphy (PG), which is most widely used.
Also, there is a variety of questionnaires suitable to assess the pre-test probability and severity of OSA. The most frequently used ones are the STOP-BANG questionnaire (SBQ), NoSAS questionnaire, and Berlin questionnaire (BQ). However, they have different sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) when being used in various populations. The aim of this study is to provide a concise and clinically-oriented review of the most frequently used questionnaires, with special attention to its strengths and limitations. Moreover, we discuss whether PSG or PG would be more preferred for confirming OSA diagnosis with the highest likelihood.

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disease of significant importance, which may lead to numerous severe clinical consequences. The gold standard in the diagnosis of this sleep-related breathing disorder (SRBD) is polysomnography (PSG). However, due to the need for high expertise of staff who perform this procedure, its complexity, and relatively low availability, some simpler substitutes have been developed; among them is polygraphy (PG), which is most widely used.
Also, there is a variety of questionnaires suitable to assess the pre-test probability and severity of OSA. The most frequently used ones are the STOP-BANG questionnaire (SBQ), NoSAS questionnaire, and Berlin questionnaire (BQ). However, they have different sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) when being used in various populations. The aim of this study is to provide a concise and clinically-oriented review of the most frequently used questionnaires, with special attention to its strengths and limitations. Moreover, we discuss whether PSG or PG would be more preferred for confirming OSA diagnosis with the highest likelihood.

Get Citation

Keywords

obstructive sleep apnea; polysomnography; polygraphy; STOP-BANG; NoSAS; Berlin questionnaire

About this article
Title

The role of screening questionnaires in the assessment of risk and severity of obstructive sleep apnea — polysomnography versus polygraphy

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 89, No 2 (2021)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

188-196

Published online

2021-04-30

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2021.0038

Pubmed

33966264

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2021;89(2):188-196.

Keywords

obstructive sleep apnea
polysomnography
polygraphy
STOP-BANG
NoSAS
Berlin questionnaire

Authors

Aleksandra Małolepsza
Aleksandra Kudrycka
Urszula Karwowska
Tetsuro Hoshino
Erik Wibowo
Péter Pál Böjti
Adam Białas
Wojciech Kuczyński

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