open access

Vol 89, No 3 (2021)
Research paper
Submitted: 2020-11-07
Accepted: 2021-01-06
Published online: 2021-06-30
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Is the Nox-T3 device scoring algorithm accurate enough for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea?

Margarida Pimenta Valério1, Samuel Pereira1, Joaquim Moita1, Fátima Teixeira1, Conceição Travassos1, Ana Sofia Coutinho1, Denny Marques Rodrigues1
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2021.0053
·
Pubmed: 34196378
·
Adv Respir Med 2021;89(3):262-267.
Affiliations
  1. Pulmonology Department, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal

open access

Vol 89, No 3 (2021)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2020-11-07
Accepted: 2021-01-06
Published online: 2021-06-30

Abstract

Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent. Home sleep apnea testing (HSAT) for OSA is rapidly expanding because of its cost effectiveness in the diagnosis of OSA. Type 3 portable monitors are used for this purpose. In most cases, these devices contain an algorithm for automatic scoring of events. We propose to study the accuracy of the automatic scoring algorithm in our population in order to compare it with the manually edited scoring of Nox-T3®.
Material and methods: For five months, a prospective study was performed. Patients were randomly distributed to the available HSAT devices. We collected the data of patients who performed HSAT with Nox-T3®. We used normality plots, the Spearman correlation, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and Bland–Altman plots.
Results: The sample consisted of 283 participants. The average manual apnea and hypopnea index (AHI) was 23.7 ± 22.1 events/h. All manual scores (AHI, apnea index, hypopnea index, and oxygen desaturation index) had strong correlations with their respective automated scores. When AHI > 15 and AHI > 30 the difference between the values of this index (automatic and manual) was not statistically significant. Also, for AHI values > 15 the mean difference between the two scoring methods was 0.17 events/h. For AHI values > 30, this difference was — 1.23 events/h.
Conclusions: When AHI is < 15, there may be a need for confirmation of automatic scores, especially in symptomatic patients with a high pretest probability of OSA. But, for patients with AHI > 15, automatic scores obtained from this device seem accurate enough to diagnose OSA in the correct clinical setting.

Abstract

Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent. Home sleep apnea testing (HSAT) for OSA is rapidly expanding because of its cost effectiveness in the diagnosis of OSA. Type 3 portable monitors are used for this purpose. In most cases, these devices contain an algorithm for automatic scoring of events. We propose to study the accuracy of the automatic scoring algorithm in our population in order to compare it with the manually edited scoring of Nox-T3®.
Material and methods: For five months, a prospective study was performed. Patients were randomly distributed to the available HSAT devices. We collected the data of patients who performed HSAT with Nox-T3®. We used normality plots, the Spearman correlation, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and Bland–Altman plots.
Results: The sample consisted of 283 participants. The average manual apnea and hypopnea index (AHI) was 23.7 ± 22.1 events/h. All manual scores (AHI, apnea index, hypopnea index, and oxygen desaturation index) had strong correlations with their respective automated scores. When AHI > 15 and AHI > 30 the difference between the values of this index (automatic and manual) was not statistically significant. Also, for AHI values > 15 the mean difference between the two scoring methods was 0.17 events/h. For AHI values > 30, this difference was — 1.23 events/h.
Conclusions: When AHI is < 15, there may be a need for confirmation of automatic scores, especially in symptomatic patients with a high pretest probability of OSA. But, for patients with AHI > 15, automatic scores obtained from this device seem accurate enough to diagnose OSA in the correct clinical setting.

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Keywords

obstructive sleep apnea, home sleep apnea testing, automatic scoring algorithm

About this article
Title

Is the Nox-T3 device scoring algorithm accurate enough for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea?

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 89, No 3 (2021)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

262-267

Published online

2021-06-30

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2021.0053

Pubmed

34196378

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2021;89(3):262-267.

Keywords

obstructive sleep apnea
home sleep apnea testing
automatic scoring algorithm

Authors

Margarida Pimenta Valério
Samuel Pereira
Joaquim Moita
Fátima Teixeira
Conceição Travassos
Ana Sofia Coutinho
Denny Marques Rodrigues

References (12)
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  9. Xu L, Han F, Keenan BT, et al. Validation of the Nox-T3 portable monitor for diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in chinese adults. J Clin Sleep Med. 2017; 13(5): 675–683.
  10. Chang Y, Xu L, Han F, et al. Validation of the Nox-T3 portable monitor for diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. J Clin Sleep Med. 2019; 15(4): 587–596.
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