open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2020)
Guidelines / Expert consensus
Published online: 2020-12-16
Submitted: 2020-10-09
Accepted: 2020-11-06
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Spirometry during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Guidelines and practical advice from the expert panel of Respiratory Physiopathology Assembly of Polish Respiratory Society

Monika Franczuk, Tadeusz Przybyłowski, Małgorzata Czajkowska-Malinowska, Jakub Radliński, Grażyna Bochenek, Stefan Wesołowski, Paweł Sliwiński
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2020.0186
·
Pubmed: 33393664
·
Adv Respir Med 2020;88(6):640-650.

open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2020)
GUIDELINES
Published online: 2020-12-16
Submitted: 2020-10-09
Accepted: 2020-11-06

Abstract

At the end of 2019, in Wuhan, the Hubei Province's capital city in China, the first cases of COVID-19 disease caused by the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, were described. The rapid spread of the infection through the world resulted in the World Health Organization announcing the COVID-19 a global pandemic in March 2020. The main routes of transmission of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, according to current evidence, are via droplets inhalation, direct contact with contaminated surfaces, and transmission via the mucous membranes of the mouth, nose, and eyes, and probably through airborne particles from the respiratory tract, generated during coughing and sneezing of infected individuals. During the pulmonary function testing (PFTs), which require strenuous breathing maneuvers and generate high-intensity airflow, aerosols, and micro-aerosols are formed from respiratory secretions and may contain viral and bacterial particles. Therefore, such forced respiratory maneuvers pose a significant risk of spreading the infection to patients and laboratory staff. According to current knowledge, the source of infection may also be an asymptomatic and a pre-symptomatic individual. Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has been increasingly prevalent in the community, and this increases a potential risk to all patients tested lung function and staff working there. As the patients' and staff's safety is of unprecedented importance, the additional precautions when performing pulmonary function tests are necessary and unquestionable. In consequence, the greater availability of consumables and personal protective equipment is indispensable. The reorganization of daily practice will prolong test time, reduce the number of tests performed, and slow down patients' flow. The guidance provides practical advice to health care professionals on performing pulmonary function tests during the COVID-19 pandemic. It has been developed basing on currently available information and recommendations from relevant health care institutions. As the COVID-19 pandemic is a rapidly evolving situation and the new scientific data has been becoming are available, the guidance will be updated over time.

Abstract

At the end of 2019, in Wuhan, the Hubei Province's capital city in China, the first cases of COVID-19 disease caused by the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, were described. The rapid spread of the infection through the world resulted in the World Health Organization announcing the COVID-19 a global pandemic in March 2020. The main routes of transmission of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, according to current evidence, are via droplets inhalation, direct contact with contaminated surfaces, and transmission via the mucous membranes of the mouth, nose, and eyes, and probably through airborne particles from the respiratory tract, generated during coughing and sneezing of infected individuals. During the pulmonary function testing (PFTs), which require strenuous breathing maneuvers and generate high-intensity airflow, aerosols, and micro-aerosols are formed from respiratory secretions and may contain viral and bacterial particles. Therefore, such forced respiratory maneuvers pose a significant risk of spreading the infection to patients and laboratory staff. According to current knowledge, the source of infection may also be an asymptomatic and a pre-symptomatic individual. Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has been increasingly prevalent in the community, and this increases a potential risk to all patients tested lung function and staff working there. As the patients' and staff's safety is of unprecedented importance, the additional precautions when performing pulmonary function tests are necessary and unquestionable. In consequence, the greater availability of consumables and personal protective equipment is indispensable. The reorganization of daily practice will prolong test time, reduce the number of tests performed, and slow down patients' flow. The guidance provides practical advice to health care professionals on performing pulmonary function tests during the COVID-19 pandemic. It has been developed basing on currently available information and recommendations from relevant health care institutions. As the COVID-19 pandemic is a rapidly evolving situation and the new scientific data has been becoming are available, the guidance will be updated over time.

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Keywords

respiratory function test; spirometry; COVID-19; bacterial viral filter; BVF

About this article
Title

Spirometry during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Guidelines and practical advice from the expert panel of Respiratory Physiopathology Assembly of Polish Respiratory Society

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 88, No 6 (2020)

Article type

Guidelines / Expert consensus

Pages

640-650

Published online

2020-12-16

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2020.0186

Pubmed

33393664

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2020;88(6):640-650.

Keywords

respiratory function test
spirometry
COVID-19
bacterial viral filter
BVF

Authors

Monika Franczuk
Tadeusz Przybyłowski
Małgorzata Czajkowska-Malinowska
Jakub Radliński
Grażyna Bochenek
Stefan Wesołowski
Paweł Sliwiński

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