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Case report
Published online: 2021-04-19
Submitted: 2020-09-19
Accepted: 2020-11-04
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Treatment of pulmonary artery stump thrombosis after lobectomy: a case report and literature review

Maria Wieteska-Miłek, Kinga Winiarczyk, Włodzimierz Kupis
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2021.0010
·
Pubmed: 33871040

open access

Ahead of Print
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2021-04-19
Submitted: 2020-09-19
Accepted: 2020-11-04

Abstract

Introduction: Lung cancer surgery is a well-known risk factor for venous thromboembolism. Thus, standard care involves the use of pharmacological and mechanical prophylaxis until discharge from the hospital. Pulmonary artery stump thrombosis (PAST) is a rare condition which can develop months to years after lung cancer surgery. This report describes a patient diagnosed with PAST and the decisions that were made regarding his treatment. Case report: A 67-year-old male was diagnosed with lung cancer due to shortness of breath, dry cough, hemoptysis, and typical chest computed tomography (CT) findings. He underwent right lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymphadenectomy by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. The procedure was complicated by the development of a right pleural empyema. After pleural drainage and an antibiotic regimen, he was discharged from the hospital with further improvement. A follow-up CT pulmonary angiography performed three months after lobectomy revealed thrombosis in the right lower lobar pulmonary artery stump. The patient had no symptoms. The attending physician decided to use anticoagulants. Consequently, the patient received low molecular-weight heparin subcutaneously for one month and a non-vitamin-K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) for the following 5 months. A CT scan performed after 3 months of anticoagulation showed complete resolution of stump thrombosis. Subsequent examinations showed no recurrence of either lung cancer or artery stump thrombosis and no anticoagulant-related bleeding. Discussion: Pulmonary artery stump thrombosis can develop after lung cancer surgery. This complication is uncommon and the prognosis is favorable in most treated cases. However, thrombosis may progress, and pulmonary embolism or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension may develop. Decisions about instituting anticoagulation therapy and its duration are made on an individual basis after considering both the benefits and the potential risks

Abstract

Introduction: Lung cancer surgery is a well-known risk factor for venous thromboembolism. Thus, standard care involves the use of pharmacological and mechanical prophylaxis until discharge from the hospital. Pulmonary artery stump thrombosis (PAST) is a rare condition which can develop months to years after lung cancer surgery. This report describes a patient diagnosed with PAST and the decisions that were made regarding his treatment. Case report: A 67-year-old male was diagnosed with lung cancer due to shortness of breath, dry cough, hemoptysis, and typical chest computed tomography (CT) findings. He underwent right lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymphadenectomy by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. The procedure was complicated by the development of a right pleural empyema. After pleural drainage and an antibiotic regimen, he was discharged from the hospital with further improvement. A follow-up CT pulmonary angiography performed three months after lobectomy revealed thrombosis in the right lower lobar pulmonary artery stump. The patient had no symptoms. The attending physician decided to use anticoagulants. Consequently, the patient received low molecular-weight heparin subcutaneously for one month and a non-vitamin-K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) for the following 5 months. A CT scan performed after 3 months of anticoagulation showed complete resolution of stump thrombosis. Subsequent examinations showed no recurrence of either lung cancer or artery stump thrombosis and no anticoagulant-related bleeding. Discussion: Pulmonary artery stump thrombosis can develop after lung cancer surgery. This complication is uncommon and the prognosis is favorable in most treated cases. However, thrombosis may progress, and pulmonary embolism or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension may develop. Decisions about instituting anticoagulation therapy and its duration are made on an individual basis after considering both the benefits and the potential risks

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Keywords

stump thrombosis, lung cancer, lobectomy, anticoagulation, pulmonary artery

About this article
Title

Treatment of pulmonary artery stump thrombosis after lobectomy: a case report and literature review

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Case report

Published online

2021-04-19

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2021.0010

Pubmed

33871040

Keywords

stump thrombosis
lung cancer
lobectomy
anticoagulation
pulmonary artery

Authors

Maria Wieteska-Miłek
Kinga Winiarczyk
Włodzimierz Kupis

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