open access

Vol 89, No 1 (2021)
Review paper
Published online: 2021-02-28
Submitted: 2020-08-12
Accepted: 2020-09-18
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The prognostic value of fixed time and self-paced walking tests in patients diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Adam J Białas, Mikołaj Iwański, Joanna Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Michał Pietrzak, Sebastian Majewski, Paweł Górski, Wojciech Piotrowski
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2020.0193
·
Pubmed: 33660248
·
Adv Respir Med 2021;89(1):49-54.

open access

Vol 89, No 1 (2021)
REVIEWS
Published online: 2021-02-28
Submitted: 2020-08-12
Accepted: 2020-09-18

Abstract

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a specific form of chronic fibrosing interstitial pneumonia that has an unknown etiology. The natural history of the disease is characterized by a progressive decline in pulmonary function and overall health and well-being. The median survival time is between 2–3 years; however, the disease course is variable and unpredictable.
The twelve-minute walking test (12MWT) and six-minute walking test (6MWT) are two fixed time tests that are commonly used in clinical practice. Our short and clinically oriented narrative review attempted to summarize current evidence supporting the use of fixed time, self-paced walking tests in predicting the outcome of patients diagnosed with IPF.
A number of studies have justified that the 6MWT is a simple, cost-effective, well documented, fixed time, and self-paced walking test which is a valid and reliable measure of disease status and can also be used as a prognostic tool in patients with IPF. However, there is a need for dedicated and validated reference equations for this population of patients.
It is also necessary to fill the knowledge gap about the role of the 12MWT. We hypothesize that it would be useful in evaluating patients that are in the early stages of the disease.

Abstract

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a specific form of chronic fibrosing interstitial pneumonia that has an unknown etiology. The natural history of the disease is characterized by a progressive decline in pulmonary function and overall health and well-being. The median survival time is between 2–3 years; however, the disease course is variable and unpredictable.
The twelve-minute walking test (12MWT) and six-minute walking test (6MWT) are two fixed time tests that are commonly used in clinical practice. Our short and clinically oriented narrative review attempted to summarize current evidence supporting the use of fixed time, self-paced walking tests in predicting the outcome of patients diagnosed with IPF.
A number of studies have justified that the 6MWT is a simple, cost-effective, well documented, fixed time, and self-paced walking test which is a valid and reliable measure of disease status and can also be used as a prognostic tool in patients with IPF. However, there is a need for dedicated and validated reference equations for this population of patients.
It is also necessary to fill the knowledge gap about the role of the 12MWT. We hypothesize that it would be useful in evaluating patients that are in the early stages of the disease.

Get Citation

Keywords

idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; walking tests; 6MWT; 12MWT; Cooper test

About this article
Title

The prognostic value of fixed time and self-paced walking tests in patients diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 89, No 1 (2021)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

49-54

Published online

2021-02-28

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2020.0193

Pubmed

33660248

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2021;89(1):49-54.

Keywords

idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
walking tests
6MWT
12MWT
Cooper test

Authors

Adam J Białas
Mikołaj Iwański
Joanna Miłkowska-Dymanowska
Michał Pietrzak
Sebastian Majewski
Paweł Górski
Wojciech Piotrowski

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