open access

Vol 88, No 5 (2020)
Research paper
Submitted: 2020-04-19
Accepted: 2020-07-20
Published online: 2020-10-24
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A comparative study evaluating C-reactive protein, sputum eosinophils and forced expiratory volume in one second in obese and nonobese asthmatics

Harish Mahender1, Raja Amarnath1, Sreenivasan Vadivelu1
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2020.0155
·
Pubmed: 33169810
·
Adv Respir Med 2020;88(5):394-399.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sree Balaji Medical College and Hospital, Bharath University, Chromepet, Chennai, India

open access

Vol 88, No 5 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2020-04-19
Accepted: 2020-07-20
Published online: 2020-10-24

Abstract

ntroduction: Asthma and obesity are considered inflammatory disorders. Inflammatory markers — sputum eosinophils, C-reactive protein (CRP) and the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were analysed to find their association in obese asthmatics and compared with their asthma control test (ACT) to understand these parameters in this phenotype.
Material and methods: After completing the asthma control test (ACT), the CRP, FEV1 and sputum eosinophils of sixty asthmatics were compared to find the association of them in obese and nonobese asthmatics and contrasted with their ACT. The data were analysed using IBM SPSS V20.0, Mann-Whitney U test (non-parametric test), Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Fisher’s exact test.
Results: We found significant differences for CRP (P = 0.001) and sputum eosinophils (P = 0.001) between obese and nonobese asthmatics, both higher in obese asthmatics and with a significant association with body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.05). The FEV1 levels were independent of the BMI levels of asthmatics. There was a significant correlation between the CRP and sputum eosin-ophils (0.52, P = 0.001) for all asthmatics. There was no significant correlation between FEV1 and sputum eosinophils (nonobese P = 0.120, obese P = 0.388) and between FEV1 and CRP (obese P = 0.423, nonobese P = 0.358) in both obese and nonobese asthmatics. Obesity had an association (P = 0.001) with ACT scores (≤ 19).
Conclusions: Sputum eosinophils and CRP were raised in obese asthmatics and had a positive association with BMI. Obese asthmatics had a poorer subjective asthma control than nonobese asthmatics despite FEV1 being independent of the BMI levels. Measuring the systemic inflammatory markers could help in additional interventions in reducing systemic inflammation and thus possibly facilitating better symptom control.

Abstract

ntroduction: Asthma and obesity are considered inflammatory disorders. Inflammatory markers — sputum eosinophils, C-reactive protein (CRP) and the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were analysed to find their association in obese asthmatics and compared with their asthma control test (ACT) to understand these parameters in this phenotype.
Material and methods: After completing the asthma control test (ACT), the CRP, FEV1 and sputum eosinophils of sixty asthmatics were compared to find the association of them in obese and nonobese asthmatics and contrasted with their ACT. The data were analysed using IBM SPSS V20.0, Mann-Whitney U test (non-parametric test), Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Fisher’s exact test.
Results: We found significant differences for CRP (P = 0.001) and sputum eosinophils (P = 0.001) between obese and nonobese asthmatics, both higher in obese asthmatics and with a significant association with body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.05). The FEV1 levels were independent of the BMI levels of asthmatics. There was a significant correlation between the CRP and sputum eosin-ophils (0.52, P = 0.001) for all asthmatics. There was no significant correlation between FEV1 and sputum eosinophils (nonobese P = 0.120, obese P = 0.388) and between FEV1 and CRP (obese P = 0.423, nonobese P = 0.358) in both obese and nonobese asthmatics. Obesity had an association (P = 0.001) with ACT scores (≤ 19).
Conclusions: Sputum eosinophils and CRP were raised in obese asthmatics and had a positive association with BMI. Obese asthmatics had a poorer subjective asthma control than nonobese asthmatics despite FEV1 being independent of the BMI levels. Measuring the systemic inflammatory markers could help in additional interventions in reducing systemic inflammation and thus possibly facilitating better symptom control.

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Keywords

C-reactive protein; sputum eosinophils; FEV1; obese asthmatics; systemic inflammation

About this article
Title

A comparative study evaluating C-reactive protein, sputum eosinophils and forced expiratory volume in one second in obese and nonobese asthmatics

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 88, No 5 (2020)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

394-399

Published online

2020-10-24

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2020.0155

Pubmed

33169810

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2020;88(5):394-399.

Keywords

C-reactive protein
sputum eosinophils
FEV1
obese asthmatics
systemic inflammation

Authors

Harish Mahender
Raja Amarnath
Sreenivasan Vadivelu

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