Advances in Respiratory Medicine

open access

Vol 88, No 5 (2020)
Research paper
Published online: 2020-10-24
Submitted: 2020-04-04
Accepted: 2020-06-16
Get Citation

Association of smoking and drug abuse with treatment failure in individuals with tuberculosis: a case-control study

Homa Serpoosh, Yadollah Hamidi, Payman Eini, Younes Mohammadi
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2020.0138
·
Pubmed: 33169808
·
Adv Respir Med 2020;88(5):383-388.

open access

Vol 88, No 5 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-10-24
Submitted: 2020-04-04
Accepted: 2020-06-16

Abstract

Introduction: Treatment failure in tuberculosis (defined as a positive sputum smear 5 months after the initiation of anti-TB treat-ment) is a major threat to the control over TB. This study aimed to investigate the association of smoking and drug abuse with treatment failure among individuals with TB.
Material and methods: Out of 286 TB patients with available data registered by the health system of Hamadan Provinces in western Iran, 24 TB patients with treatment failure (positive sputum smear, 5 months after initiation of anti-TB treatment) and 262 patients without treatment failure (negative sputum smear, five months after initiation of anti-TB treatment) were selected as case and control groups, respectively. These two groups were compared to each other in terms of demographic status which include age, sex, job, residence, and risk factors such as smoking and drug abuse status. An odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval was used as a measure of association. The Bonferroni correction was used to counteract multiple comparisons, therefore, a p-value of less than 0.004 was statistically significant.
Results: No significant association was found between treatment failure and age, residence, comorbidity, education level, job status, sex, smoking, and method of drug abuse (P > 0.004). However, a significant association was found between duration of smoking, number of cigarettes per day, and drug abuse with treatment failure in univariate analysis (P < 0.004). In multivariate analysis, only an association with drug abuse was significantly associated with treatment failure (P = 0.047).
Conclusion: Drug abuse substantially increases the risk of treatment failure. Therefore, in order to control TB, it is suggested that preventive programs are designed in order to decrease drug abuse among TB patients before starting treatment.

Abstract

Introduction: Treatment failure in tuberculosis (defined as a positive sputum smear 5 months after the initiation of anti-TB treat-ment) is a major threat to the control over TB. This study aimed to investigate the association of smoking and drug abuse with treatment failure among individuals with TB.
Material and methods: Out of 286 TB patients with available data registered by the health system of Hamadan Provinces in western Iran, 24 TB patients with treatment failure (positive sputum smear, 5 months after initiation of anti-TB treatment) and 262 patients without treatment failure (negative sputum smear, five months after initiation of anti-TB treatment) were selected as case and control groups, respectively. These two groups were compared to each other in terms of demographic status which include age, sex, job, residence, and risk factors such as smoking and drug abuse status. An odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval was used as a measure of association. The Bonferroni correction was used to counteract multiple comparisons, therefore, a p-value of less than 0.004 was statistically significant.
Results: No significant association was found between treatment failure and age, residence, comorbidity, education level, job status, sex, smoking, and method of drug abuse (P > 0.004). However, a significant association was found between duration of smoking, number of cigarettes per day, and drug abuse with treatment failure in univariate analysis (P < 0.004). In multivariate analysis, only an association with drug abuse was significantly associated with treatment failure (P = 0.047).
Conclusion: Drug abuse substantially increases the risk of treatment failure. Therefore, in order to control TB, it is suggested that preventive programs are designed in order to decrease drug abuse among TB patients before starting treatment.

Get Citation

Keywords

tuberculosis; smoking; drug abuse; treatment outcome

About this article
Title

Association of smoking and drug abuse with treatment failure in individuals with tuberculosis: a case-control study

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 88, No 5 (2020)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

383-388

Published online

2020-10-24

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2020.0138

Pubmed

33169808

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2020;88(5):383-388.

Keywords

tuberculosis
smoking
drug abuse
treatment outcome

Authors

Homa Serpoosh
Yadollah Hamidi
Payman Eini
Younes Mohammadi

References (34)
  1. Gagneux S. Ecology and evolution of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Nat Rev Microbiol. 2018; 16(4): 202–213.
  2. MacNeil A, Glaziou P, Sismanidis C, et al. Global epidemiology of tuberculosis and progress toward achieving global targets 2017. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2019; 68(11): 263–266.
  3. Dirlikov E, Raviglione M, Scano F. Global tuberculosis control: toward the 2015 targets and beyond. Ann Intern Med. 2015; 163(1): 52–58.
  4. World Health Orgnization. Global Tuberculosis Report 2019, 2018.
  5. Getahun H, Matteelli A, Abubakar I, et al. Latent mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. N Engl J Med. 2015; 372(22): 2127–2135.
  6. Cohen A, Mathiasen VD, Schön T, et al. The global prevalence of latent tuberculosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Eur Respir J. 2019; 54(3).
  7. Houben RM, Dodd PJ. The global burden of latent tuberculosis infection: a re-estimation using mathematical modelling. PLoS Med. 2016; 13(10): e1002152.
  8. Mahara G, Yang K, Chen S, et al. Socio-Economic predictors and distribution of tuberculosis incidence in Beijing, China: a study using a combination of spatial statistics and GIS technology. Med Sci (Basel). 2018; 6(2).
  9. Imtiaz S, Shield KD, Roerecke M, et al. Alcohol consumption as a risk factor for tuberculosis: meta-analyses and burden of disease. Eur Respir J. 2017; 50(1).
  10. Silva DR, Muñoz-Torrico M, Duarte R, et al. Risk factors for tuberculosis: diabetes, smoking, alcohol use, and the use of other drugs. J Bras Pneumol. 2018; 44(2): 145–152.
  11. Narasimhan P, Wood J, Macintyre CR, et al. Risk factors for tuberculosis. Pulm Med. 2013; 2013: 828939.
  12. Gebrezgabiher G, Romha G, Ejeta E, et al. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients under directly observed treatment short course and factors affecting outcome in Southern Ethiopia: a five-year retrospective study. PLoS One. 2016; 11(2): e0150560.
  13. World Health Organization. Tuberculosis control: the DOTS strategy (Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course): an annotated bibliography. World Health Organization, 1997.
  14. Gandhi NR, Nunn P, Dheda K, et al. Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: a threat to global control of tuberculosis. Lancet. 2010; 375(9728): 1830–1843.
  15. Cherkaoui I, Sabouni R, Ghali I, et al. Risk factors for tuberculosis treatment failure, default, or relapse and outcomes of retreatment in Morocco. BMC Public Health. 2011; 11(4): 140.
  16. Diallo A, Dahourou DL, Dah TT, et al. Factors associated with tuberculosis treatment failure in the Central East Health region of Burkina Faso. Pan Afr Med J. 2018; 30: 293.
  17. Diallo A, Dahourou DL, Dah TT, et al. Factors associated with tuberculosis treatment failure in the Central East Health region of Burkina Faso. Pan Afr Med J. 2018; 30: 293.
  18. Pizzol D, Veronese N, Marotta C, et al. Predictors of therapy failure in newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis cases in Beira, Mozambique. BMC Res Notes. 2018; 11(1): 99.
  19. Namukwaya E, Nakwagala FN, Mulekya F, et al. Predictors of treatment failure among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Mulago hospital, Uganda. Afr Health Sci. 2011; 11 Suppl 1: S105–S111.
  20. Lackey B, Seas C, Van der Stuyft P, et al. Patient characteristics associated with tuberculosis treatment default: a cohort study in a high-incidence area of Lima, Peru. PLoS One. 2015; 10(6): e0128541.
  21. El-Shabrawy M, El-Shafei D. Evaluation of treatment failure outcome and its predictors among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Sharkia Governorate, 2013–2014. Egyptian Journal of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis. 2017; 66(1): 145–152.
  22. Greenland S, Lash TL. Rothman KJ, Greenland S, Lash TL. Modern epidemiology. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 2008.
  23. Lackey B, Seas C, Van der Stuyft P, et al. Patient characteristics associated with tuberculosis treatment default: a cohort study in a high-incidence area of Lima, Peru. PLoS One. 2015; 10(6): e0128541.
  24. Silva MR, Pereira JC, Costa RR, et al. Drug addiction and alcoholism as predictors for tuberculosis treatment default in Brazil: a prospective cohort study. Epidemiol Infect. 2017; 145(16): 3516–3524.
  25. Alo A, Gounder S, Graham SM. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of tuberculosis cases hospitalised in the intensive phase in Fiji. Public Health Action. 2014; 4(3): 164–168.
  26. Bashirian S, Barati M, Mohammadi Y, et al. Factors associated with hookah use among male high school students: the role of demographic characteristics and hookah user and non-user prototypes. J Res Health Sci. 2016; 16(4): 217–223.
  27. Organization WH. WHO global report on trends in prevalence of tobacco smoking 2000-2025: World Health Organization; 2018.
  28. Peacock A, Leung J, Larney S, et al. Global statistics on alcohol, tobacco and illicit drug use: 2017 status report. Addiction. 2018; 113(10): 1905–1926.
  29. World Health Organization. Smoking and tuberculosis: a dangerous combination 2018 [cited 2020]. Available from: http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/communicable-diseases/tuberculosis/news/news/2018/3/smoking-and-tuberculosis-a-dangerous-combination. [Last accessed: 04.09.2020].
  30. Brunet L, Pai M, Davids V, et al. High prevalence of smoking among patients with suspected tuberculosis in South Africa. Eur Respir J. 2011; 38(1): 139–146.
  31. Deiss RG, Rodwell TC, Garfein RS. Tuberculosis and illicit drug use: review and update. Clin Infect Dis. 2009; 48(1): 72–82.
  32. Getahun H, Baddeley A, Raviglione M. Managing tuberculosis in people who use and inject illicit drugs. Bull World Health Organ. 2013; 91(2): 154–156.
  33. Schneider NK, Novotny TE. Addressing smoking cessation in tuberculosis control. Bull World Health Organ. 2007; 85(10): 820–821.
  34. Adane AA, Alene KA, Koye DN, et al. Non-adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment and determinant factors among patients with tuberculosis in northwest Ethiopia. PLoS One. 2013; 8(11): e78791.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

Czasopismo Pneumonologia i Alergologia Polska dostęne jest również w Ikamed - księgarnia medyczna

Wydawcą serwisu jest "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl