open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2020)
Research paper
Published online: 2020-10-30
Submitted: 2020-03-27
Accepted: 2020-07-06
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Study of genetic variants in chromosome 5p15.33 region in non-smoker lung cancer patients

Iman Mandour, Sabah Ahmed Mohamed Hussein, Rania Essam, Menna Ahmad El-Hossainy
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2020.0161
·
Pubmed: 33393640
·
Adv Respir Med 2020;88(6):485-494.

open access

Vol 88, No 6 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-10-30
Submitted: 2020-03-27
Accepted: 2020-07-06

Abstract

Introduction: Genome-wide association studies have identified that genetic polymorphisms in the telomerase reverse transcrip-tase (TERT) and cleft lip and palate transmembrane 1-like (CLPTM1L) genes may play important roles in the development of lung cancer in never smokers.
Material and methods: This study was aiming to evaluate the associations between the risk of lung cancer in never smokers and single nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes by Real-Time Taqman assay, in forty lung cancer patients and forty apparently healthy age-matched controls selected from the chest department, Kasr Al-Ainy hospital from June 2018 to January 2019.
Results: Adenocarcinoma was the most common histopathological subtype of lung cancer in the study patients. Also, the prevalence of females having adenocarcinoma was more common than males. The heterozygous form of the CLPTM1L occurred more frequently in the subjects aged above 46 years (P=0.019). There was a significant association between (rs 2730100) (c. 1574-3777C>A) TERT and CLPTM1L (rs 451360) (c.1532+ 1051C>A) genotypes and the incidence of lung cancer in never smokers, especially adenocarcinoma, a subtype of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC).
Conclusions: Polymorphism in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and cleft lip and palate transmembrane 1 like (CLPT-M1L) genes may play an important role in the development of NSCLC, especially adenocarcinoma subtype. The two genes are located in the chromosome 5p15.33.

Abstract

Introduction: Genome-wide association studies have identified that genetic polymorphisms in the telomerase reverse transcrip-tase (TERT) and cleft lip and palate transmembrane 1-like (CLPTM1L) genes may play important roles in the development of lung cancer in never smokers.
Material and methods: This study was aiming to evaluate the associations between the risk of lung cancer in never smokers and single nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes by Real-Time Taqman assay, in forty lung cancer patients and forty apparently healthy age-matched controls selected from the chest department, Kasr Al-Ainy hospital from June 2018 to January 2019.
Results: Adenocarcinoma was the most common histopathological subtype of lung cancer in the study patients. Also, the prevalence of females having adenocarcinoma was more common than males. The heterozygous form of the CLPTM1L occurred more frequently in the subjects aged above 46 years (P=0.019). There was a significant association between (rs 2730100) (c. 1574-3777C>A) TERT and CLPTM1L (rs 451360) (c.1532+ 1051C>A) genotypes and the incidence of lung cancer in never smokers, especially adenocarcinoma, a subtype of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC).
Conclusions: Polymorphism in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and cleft lip and palate transmembrane 1 like (CLPT-M1L) genes may play an important role in the development of NSCLC, especially adenocarcinoma subtype. The two genes are located in the chromosome 5p15.33.

Get Citation

Keywords

genetic variation; 5p15.33 chromosome; lung cancer; non-smokers.

About this article
Title

Study of genetic variants in chromosome 5p15.33 region in non-smoker lung cancer patients

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 88, No 6 (2020)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

485-494

Published online

2020-10-30

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2020.0161

Pubmed

33393640

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2020;88(6):485-494.

Keywords

genetic variation
5p15.33 chromosome
lung cancer
non-smokers.

Authors

Iman Mandour
Sabah Ahmed Mohamed Hussein
Rania Essam
Menna Ahmad El-Hossainy

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