open access

Vol 88, No 4 (2020)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2020-07-27
Submitted: 2020-03-02
Accepted: 2020-04-06
Get Citation

High-intensity exercise improves pulmonary function and exercise tolerance in a patient with TSC-LAM

Thomas William Lowder
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2020.0129
·
Pubmed: 32869270
·
Adv Respir Med 2020;88(4):356-359.

open access

Vol 88, No 4 (2020)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2020-07-27
Submitted: 2020-03-02
Accepted: 2020-04-06

Abstract

Introduction: While exercise has been shown to improve respiratory symptoms, exercise tolerance, and bone mineral density in many populations, no supervised exercise training interventions have been undertaken in patients with lymphangioleiomyo-matosis (LAM).
Material and methods: One patient with TSC-LAM (tuberous sclerosis complex lymphangioleiomyomatosis) participated in two weekly sessions (50–60 min) of supervised aerobic exercise at 80–85% heart rate max for one year. Treadmill ergometry (VO2peak), spirometry (FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, peak flow), and bone mineral density testing were performed prior to every 3 months. Results: After one year of supervised aerobic exercise training we saw dramatic increases in the patient’s VO2max (20%), FEV1 (9.5%), FEV1/FVC (9.1%) and peak flow (47%).
Conclusions: The results from this study indicate that supervised exercise training can improve exercise tolerance and pulmonary function in a patient with lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Further research is needed, including longitudinal studies with larger sample sizes, to determine long-term effects and consistency of these findings. Aerobic exercise may offer a viable alternative or com-pliment to pharmacological interventions in the treatment of lymphangioleiomyomatosis. We show that high-intensity exercise training can markedly and safely improve pulmonary function in a patient with TSC-LAM. While we did not record quality of life or mood states, our patient did report improved self-confidence as well as enhanced mood.

Abstract

Introduction: While exercise has been shown to improve respiratory symptoms, exercise tolerance, and bone mineral density in many populations, no supervised exercise training interventions have been undertaken in patients with lymphangioleiomyo-matosis (LAM).
Material and methods: One patient with TSC-LAM (tuberous sclerosis complex lymphangioleiomyomatosis) participated in two weekly sessions (50–60 min) of supervised aerobic exercise at 80–85% heart rate max for one year. Treadmill ergometry (VO2peak), spirometry (FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, peak flow), and bone mineral density testing were performed prior to every 3 months. Results: After one year of supervised aerobic exercise training we saw dramatic increases in the patient’s VO2max (20%), FEV1 (9.5%), FEV1/FVC (9.1%) and peak flow (47%).
Conclusions: The results from this study indicate that supervised exercise training can improve exercise tolerance and pulmonary function in a patient with lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Further research is needed, including longitudinal studies with larger sample sizes, to determine long-term effects and consistency of these findings. Aerobic exercise may offer a viable alternative or com-pliment to pharmacological interventions in the treatment of lymphangioleiomyomatosis. We show that high-intensity exercise training can markedly and safely improve pulmonary function in a patient with TSC-LAM. While we did not record quality of life or mood states, our patient did report improved self-confidence as well as enhanced mood.

Get Citation

Keywords

tuberous sclerosis; exercise; lymphangioleiomyomatosis

About this article
Title

High-intensity exercise improves pulmonary function and exercise tolerance in a patient with TSC-LAM

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 88, No 4 (2020)

Pages

356-359

Published online

2020-07-27

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2020.0129

Pubmed

32869270

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2020;88(4):356-359.

Keywords

tuberous sclerosis
exercise
lymphangioleiomyomatosis

Authors

Thomas William Lowder

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