open access

Vol 88, No 5 (2020)
Brief communication
Submitted: 2020-02-25
Accepted: 2020-07-19
Published online: 2020-10-24
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Longitudinal changes in exercise capacity among adult cystic fibrosis patients

Afroditi K Boutou1, Katerina Manika23, Marija Hajimitrova2, Georgia Pitsiou4, Pinelopi Giannakopoulou5, Evdokia Sourla43, Ioannis Kioumis43
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2020.0145
·
Pubmed: 33169814
·
Adv Respir Med 2020;88(5):420-423.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Respiratory Medicine, G Papanikolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece
  2. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
  3. Adult Cystic Fibrosis Unit, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
  4. Department of Respiratory Failure, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
  5. Department of Cardiology, G Papanikolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece

open access

Vol 88, No 5 (2020)
PRELIMINARY REPORT
Submitted: 2020-02-25
Accepted: 2020-07-19
Published online: 2020-10-24

Abstract

Introduction: Longitudinal data regarding changes in exercise capacity among adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are currently scarce. The aim of this brief report was to assess changes in exercise capacity among adult CF patients with stable and mild-to-moderate disease eight years after their initial evaluation.
Material and methods: Maximum cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) was utilized. Other assessments included Doppler echocardiography, the 6-minute walking test, spirometry, and lung volume evaluation.
Results: Eleven (6 male, 5 female) patients completed both evaluations (initial and after eight years). During follow-up, indices of ventilatory impairment (such as ventilatory reserve; p=0.019, and ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide; p = 0.047) deterio-rated significantly following a decline in respiratory function measurements. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2), both as an absolute (26.6 ± 8.46 vs 23.89 ± 6.16 mL/kg/min; p = 0.098) and as a % of predicted value (71.21 ± 16.54 vs 70.60 ± 15.45; p = 0.872), did not deteriorate. This is also true for oxygen pulse (p = 0.743), left heart ejection fraction (p = 0.574), and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (p = 0.441). However, the anaerobic threshold, both as an absolute (p = 0.009) and as a % of predicted value (p = 0.047), was significantly lower during follow-up.
Conclusion: In adult CF patients with stable, mild-to-moderate disease, a peak VO2 may be preserved for several years. However, even in these patients, deconditioning is present.

Abstract

Introduction: Longitudinal data regarding changes in exercise capacity among adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are currently scarce. The aim of this brief report was to assess changes in exercise capacity among adult CF patients with stable and mild-to-moderate disease eight years after their initial evaluation.
Material and methods: Maximum cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) was utilized. Other assessments included Doppler echocardiography, the 6-minute walking test, spirometry, and lung volume evaluation.
Results: Eleven (6 male, 5 female) patients completed both evaluations (initial and after eight years). During follow-up, indices of ventilatory impairment (such as ventilatory reserve; p=0.019, and ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide; p = 0.047) deterio-rated significantly following a decline in respiratory function measurements. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2), both as an absolute (26.6 ± 8.46 vs 23.89 ± 6.16 mL/kg/min; p = 0.098) and as a % of predicted value (71.21 ± 16.54 vs 70.60 ± 15.45; p = 0.872), did not deteriorate. This is also true for oxygen pulse (p = 0.743), left heart ejection fraction (p = 0.574), and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (p = 0.441). However, the anaerobic threshold, both as an absolute (p = 0.009) and as a % of predicted value (p = 0.047), was significantly lower during follow-up.
Conclusion: In adult CF patients with stable, mild-to-moderate disease, a peak VO2 may be preserved for several years. However, even in these patients, deconditioning is present.

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Keywords

cardiopulmonary exercise testing; peak oxygen uptake; anaerobic threshold; longitudinal study; adult cystic fibrosis patients

About this article
Title

Longitudinal changes in exercise capacity among adult cystic fibrosis patients

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 88, No 5 (2020)

Article type

Brief communication

Pages

420-423

Published online

2020-10-24

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2020.0145

Pubmed

33169814

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2020;88(5):420-423.

Keywords

cardiopulmonary exercise testing
peak oxygen uptake
anaerobic threshold
longitudinal study
adult cystic fibrosis patients

Authors

Afroditi K Boutou
Katerina Manika
Marija Hajimitrova
Georgia Pitsiou
Pinelopi Giannakopoulou
Evdokia Sourla
Ioannis Kioumis

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