open access

Ahead of Print
Case report
Published online: 2021-04-16
Submitted: 2020-01-20
Accepted: 2020-07-19
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The effect of buprenorphine vs methadone on sleep breathing disorders

Parisa Adimi Naghan, Javad Setareh, Majid Malekmohammad
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2020.0160
·
Pubmed: 33871044

open access

Ahead of Print
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2021-04-16
Submitted: 2020-01-20
Accepted: 2020-07-19

Abstract

Opioids are used widely as analgesics and can play an important role in agonist maintenance therapy for opium dependence. Despite their benefits, the negative effects on the respiratory system remain an important side effect to be considered. Ataxic breathing, obstructive sleep apnea, and most of all central sleep apnea are among these concerns. Obstructive sleep apnea leads to various metabolic, cardiovascular, cognitive, and mental side effects and may result in abrupt mortality. Buprenorphine is a semisynthetic opioid, a partial mu-opioid agonist with limited respiratory toxicity preferably used by these patients, as it is accompanied by significantly lower risk factors in the development of obstructive and central sleep apnea. In this manuscript, the case of a patient is reported who underwent methadone maintenance therapy which was shifted to buprenorphine in order to observe possible changes in sleep-related breathing disorders. The results of this study indicate a reduction in these problems through the desaturation and apnea hypopnea index of methadone substituted by buprenorphine while no change in sleepiness was observed.

Abstract

Opioids are used widely as analgesics and can play an important role in agonist maintenance therapy for opium dependence. Despite their benefits, the negative effects on the respiratory system remain an important side effect to be considered. Ataxic breathing, obstructive sleep apnea, and most of all central sleep apnea are among these concerns. Obstructive sleep apnea leads to various metabolic, cardiovascular, cognitive, and mental side effects and may result in abrupt mortality. Buprenorphine is a semisynthetic opioid, a partial mu-opioid agonist with limited respiratory toxicity preferably used by these patients, as it is accompanied by significantly lower risk factors in the development of obstructive and central sleep apnea. In this manuscript, the case of a patient is reported who underwent methadone maintenance therapy which was shifted to buprenorphine in order to observe possible changes in sleep-related breathing disorders. The results of this study indicate a reduction in these problems through the desaturation and apnea hypopnea index of methadone substituted by buprenorphine while no change in sleepiness was observed.

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Keywords

opioid; methadone; buprenorphine; sleep breathing disorders

About this article
Title

The effect of buprenorphine vs methadone on sleep breathing disorders

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Case report

Published online

2021-04-16

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2020.0160

Pubmed

33871044

Keywords

opioid
methadone
buprenorphine
sleep breathing disorders

Authors

Parisa Adimi Naghan
Javad Setareh
Majid Malekmohammad

References (13)
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