open access

Vol 87, No 4 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-08-30
Submitted: 2018-12-23
Accepted: 2019-07-16
Get Citation

The TNF-α, P53 protein response and lung respiratory changes to exercise, chronic hypoxia and Adiantum capillus-veneris supplementation

Mehdi Yadegari, Simin Riahy, Shadmehr Mirdar, Gholamreza Hamidian, Seyed Mohsen Afkhami, Ayoub Saeidi, Fatma Rhibi, Abderraouf Ben Abderrahman, Anthony C. Hackney, Hassane Zouhal
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.2019.0037
·
Pubmed: 31476010
·
Adv Respir Med 2019;87(4):226-234.

open access

Vol 87, No 4 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-08-30
Submitted: 2018-12-23
Accepted: 2019-07-16

Abstract

Introduction: Evidence suggests that hypoxia and high-intensity exercise training can increase apoptosis of lung cells and Adiantum capillus-veneris (Ac-v) extract can have anti-apoptotic effects. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of chronic hypoxia and the (Ac-v) extraction as a supplement on TNF-a and P53 protein expression as well as the respiratory surface. Material and methods: 24 healthy Wistar rats (age = 4 weeks, weight = 72 = 9 gr) were trained using interval training for 6 weeks followed by a 3-week stay in hypoxia conditions. Half of the hypoxia samples received 500 ml/gr/per body weight daily (Ac-v) within 3 weeks of hypoxia. At the end, the lung tissue was removed for histological and immunohistological analysis. Results: After 3 weeks of hypoxia exposure following 6 weeks of exercise, expression of P53 and TNF-a increased and the respiratory surface decreased (p ≤ 0.05). After 3 weeks of taking the Ac-v extract during hypoxia exposure, reduced P53 and TNF-a expression and the increased respiratory surface were observed (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusions: Chronic hypoxia may be considered as a strong stimulus leading to the expression of proteins involved in apoptosis and tissue disruption. However, our findings suggest that the antioxidative properties of Ac-v extract could decrease the destructive structural and molecular events that happen along with hypoxia exposure or intense exercise training.

Abstract

Introduction: Evidence suggests that hypoxia and high-intensity exercise training can increase apoptosis of lung cells and Adiantum capillus-veneris (Ac-v) extract can have anti-apoptotic effects. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of chronic hypoxia and the (Ac-v) extraction as a supplement on TNF-a and P53 protein expression as well as the respiratory surface. Material and methods: 24 healthy Wistar rats (age = 4 weeks, weight = 72 = 9 gr) were trained using interval training for 6 weeks followed by a 3-week stay in hypoxia conditions. Half of the hypoxia samples received 500 ml/gr/per body weight daily (Ac-v) within 3 weeks of hypoxia. At the end, the lung tissue was removed for histological and immunohistological analysis. Results: After 3 weeks of hypoxia exposure following 6 weeks of exercise, expression of P53 and TNF-a increased and the respiratory surface decreased (p ≤ 0.05). After 3 weeks of taking the Ac-v extract during hypoxia exposure, reduced P53 and TNF-a expression and the increased respiratory surface were observed (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusions: Chronic hypoxia may be considered as a strong stimulus leading to the expression of proteins involved in apoptosis and tissue disruption. However, our findings suggest that the antioxidative properties of Ac-v extract could decrease the destructive structural and molecular events that happen along with hypoxia exposure or intense exercise training.

Get Citation

Keywords

apoptosis, lung, interval training, respiratory surface

About this article
Title

The TNF-α, P53 protein response and lung respiratory changes to exercise, chronic hypoxia and Adiantum capillus-veneris supplementation

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 87, No 4 (2019)

Pages

226-234

Published online

2019-08-30

DOI

10.5603/ARM.2019.0037

Pubmed

31476010

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2019;87(4):226-234.

Keywords

apoptosis
lung
interval training
respiratory surface

Authors

Mehdi Yadegari
Simin Riahy
Shadmehr Mirdar
Gholamreza Hamidian
Seyed Mohsen Afkhami
Ayoub Saeidi
Fatma Rhibi
Abderraouf Ben Abderrahman
Anthony C. Hackney
Hassane Zouhal

References (44)
  1. Amaral SL, Papanek PE, Greene AS. Angiotensin II and VEGF are involved in angiogenesis induced by short-term exercise training. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2001; 281(3): H1163–H1169.
  2. Dvorak HF, Nagy JA, Feng D, et al. Vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor, microvascular hyperpermeability, and angiogenesis. Am J Pathol. 1995; 146(5): 1029–1039.
  3. Yan Hl, Xue G, Mei Q, et al. Repression of the miR-17-92 cluster by p53 has an important function in hypoxia-induced apoptosis. EMBO J. 2009; 28(18): 2719–2732.
  4. Liu L, Cash TP, Jones RG, et al. Hypoxia-induced energy stress regulates mRNA translation and cell growth. Mol Cell. 2006; 21(4): 521–531.
  5. Jain M, Sznajder JI. Effects of hypoxia on the alveolar epithelium. Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2005; 2(3): 202–205.
  6. Höpker K, Hagmann H, Khurshid S, et al. AATF/Che-1 acts as a phosphorylation-dependent molecular modulator to repress p53-driven apoptosis. EMBO J. 2012; 31(20): 3961–3975.
  7. Favaloro B, Allocati N, Graziano V, et al. Role of apoptosis in disease. Aging (Albany NY). 2012; 4(5): 330–349.
  8. Vanden Berghe T, Linkermann A, Jouan-Lanhouet S, et al. Regulated necrosis: the expanding network of non-apoptotic cell death pathways. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2014; 15(2): 135–147.
  9. Kayal R, Siqueira M, Alblowi J, et al. TNF-α mediates diabetes-enhanced chondrocyte apoptosis during fracture healing and stimulates chondrocyte apoptosis Through FOXO1. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2010; 25(7): 1604–1615.
  10. Chang NS. A potential role of p53 and WOX1 in mitochondrial apoptosis (review). Int J Mol Med. 2002; 9(1): 19–24.
  11. Speidel D. Transcription-independent p53 apoptosis: an alternative route to death. Trends Cell Biol. 2010; 20(1): 14–24.
  12. Suliman A, Lam A, Datta R, et al. Intracellular mechanisms of TRAIL: apoptosis through mitochondrial-dependent and -independent pathways. Oncogene. 2001; 20(17): 2122–2133.
  13. Volaklis KA, Spassis ATh, Tokmakidis SP, et al. Training and detraining effects of a combined-strength and aerobic exercise program on blood lipids in patients with coronary artery disease. J Cardiopulm Rehabil. 2003; 23(3): 193–200.
  14. Matés JM, Sánchez-Jiménez FM. Role of reactive oxygen species in apoptosis: implications for cancer therapy. Int J Biochem Cell Biol. 2000; 32(2): 157–170.
  15. Goldfarb AH, Bloomer RJ, McKenzie MJ. Combined antioxidant treatment effects on blood oxidative stress after eccentric exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005; 37(2): 234–239.
  16. Yuan Q, Zhang X, Liu Z, et al. Ethanol extract of adiantum capillus-veneris L. suppresses the production of inflammatory mediators by inhibiting nf-κb activation. J Ethnopharmacol. 2013; 147(3): 603–611.
  17. Nilforoushzadeh MA, Javanmard SH, Ghanadian M, et al. The effects of adiantum capillus-veneris on wound healing: an experimental in vitro evaluation. Int J Prev Med. 2014; 5(10): 1261–1268.
  18. Wendakoon C, Calderon P, Gagnon D. Evaluation of selected medicinal plants extracted in different ethanol concentrations for antibacterial activity against human pathogens. Journal of Medicinally Active Plants. 2012; 1(2): 60–68.
  19. Schneider JP, Ochs M. Stereology of the lung. Methods Cell Biol. 2013; 113: 257–294.
  20. Harvey BS, Sia TC, Wattchow DA, et al. Interleukin 17A evoked mucosal damage is attenuated by cannabidiol and anandamide in a human colonic explant model. Cytokine. 2014; 65(2): 236–244.
  21. Di Cataldo S, Ficarra E, Acquaviva A, et al. Automated segmentation of tissue images for computerized IHC analysis. Comput Methods Programs Biomed. 2010; 100(1): 1–15.
  22. Ochs M, Mühlfeld C. Quantitative microscopy of the lung: a problem-based approach. Part 1: basic principles of lung stereology. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2013; 305(1): L15–L22.
  23. Kumar S, Samydurai P, Ramakrishnan R, et al. Mass spectrometry Analysis of Bioactive Constuents of Adiantum Capillus-Veneris L. Int J Pharm Pharm Sci. 2014; 6(4): 60–63.
  24. Papaioannou AI, Kostikas K, Kollia P, et al. Clinical implications for vascular endothelial growth factor in the lung: friend or foe? Respir Res. 2006; 7: 128.
  25. Bergeron C, Tulic MK, Hamid Q. Tools used to measure airway remodelling in research. Eur Respir J. 2007; 29(3): 596–604.
  26. Hammond EM, Giaccia AJ. The role of p53 in hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2005; 331(3): 718–725.
  27. Phaneuf S, Leeuwenburgh C. Apoptosis and exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001; 33(3): 393–396.
  28. Arslan S, Erdem S, Sivri A, et al. Exercise-induced apoptosis of rat skeletal muscle and the effect of meloxicam. Rheumatol Int. 2002; 21(4): 133–136.
  29. Chandel NS, Trzyna WC, McClintock DS, et al. Role of oxidants in NF-kappa B activation and TNF-alpha gene transcription induced by hypoxia and endotoxin. J Immunol. 2000; 165(2): 1013–1021.
  30. Leeper-Woodford S, Detmer K. Acute hypoxia increases alveolar macrophage tumor necrosis factor activity and alters NF-κB expression. American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology. 1999; 276(6): L909–L916.
  31. Burikhanov R, Zhao Y, Goswami A, et al. The tumor suppressor Par-4 activates an extrinsic pathway for apoptosis. Cell. 2009; 138(2): 377–388.
  32. Yin XM. Bid, a critical mediator for apoptosis induced by the activation of Fas/TNF-R1 death receptors in hepatocytes. J Mol Med (Berl). 2000; 78(4): 203–211.
  33. Greijer AE, van der Wall E. The role of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in hypoxia induced apoptosis. J Clin Pathol. 2004; 57(10): 1009–1014.
  34. Kenney WL, Wilmore JH, Costill DL. Physiology of sport and exercise. Human Kinetics. ; 2015.
  35. Lee SD, Kuo WW, Lin JA, et al. Effects of long-term intermittent hypoxia on mitochondrial and Fas death receptor dependent apoptotic pathways in rat hearts. Int J Cardiol. 2007; 116(3): 348–356.
  36. Compernolle V, Brusselmans K, Acker T, et al. Loss of HIF-2alpha and inhibition of VEGF impair fetal lung maturation, whereas treatment with VEGF prevents fatal respiratory distress in premature mice. Nat Med. 2002; 8(7): 702–710.
  37. Phaneuf S, Leeuwenburgh C. Apoptosis and exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001; 33(3): 393–396.
  38. Rabbani ZN, Mi J, Zhang Y, et al. Hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha signaling in fractionated radiation-induced lung injury: role of oxidative stress and tissue hypoxia. Radiat Res. 2010; 173(2): 165–174.
  39. Morishima N, Nakanishi K, Takenouchi H, et al. An endoplasmic reticulum stress-specific caspase cascade in apoptosis. Cytochrome c-independent activation of caspase-9 by caspase-12. J Biol Chem. 2002; 277(37): 34287–34294.
  40. Sharma G, Chahar M, Dobhal S, et al. Phytochemical constituents, traditional uses, and pharmacological properties of the genus plumeria. Chemistry & Biodiversity. 2011; 8(8): 1357–1369.
  41. Pourmorad F, Hosseinimehr S, Shahabimajd N. Antioxidant activity, phenol and flavonoid contents of some selected Iranian medicinal plants. African journal of Botechnology. 2006; 5(11).
  42. Yuan Q, Wang J, Ruan J. Screening for bioactive compounds from Adiantum capillus–veneris L. L J Chem Soc Pak. 2012; 34: 207–216.
  43. Ichikawa D, Matsui A, Imai M, et al. Effect of various catechins on the IL-12p40 production by murine peritoneal macrophages and a macrophage cell line, J774.1. Biol Pharm Bull. 2004; 27(9): 1353–1358.
  44. Kasabri V, Al-Hallaq EK, Bustanji YK, et al. Antiobesity and antihyperglycaemic effects of Adiantum capillus-veneris extracts: in vitro and in vivo evaluations. Pharm Biol. 2017; 55(1): 164–172.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

Czasopismo Pneumonologia i Alergologia Polska dostęne jest również w Ikamed - księgarnia medyczna

Wydawcą serwisu jest "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl