open access

Vol 87, No 1 (2019)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2019-03-04
Submitted: 2018-11-18
Accepted: 2019-01-28
Get Citation

Measles pneumonitis

Pinelopi Schoini, Theodoros Karampitsakos, Maria Avdikou, Aggeliki Athanasopoulou, Georgios Tsoukalas, Argyrios Tzouvelekis
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2019.0010
·
Pubmed: 30830960
·
Adv Respir Med 2019;87(1):63-67.

open access

Vol 87, No 1 (2019)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2019-03-04
Submitted: 2018-11-18
Accepted: 2019-01-28

Abstract

Measles is an acute febrile illness, potentially fatal and highly contagious, which is transmitted through the respiratory mode. Fever
combined with one of the following: cough, coryza, conjunctivitis are the first manifestations of the disease. Koplik’s spots may
also appear on the buccal mucosa providing an opportunity to set the diagnosis even before the emergence of rash. Rash typically
appears 3–4 days after the onset of fever, initially on the face and behind the ears, and its appearance is associated with the peak
of the symptoms. Measles affects multiple systems, including the respiratory system, with pneumonia being one of the most lethal
complications. Management involves best supportive care, correction of dehydration and nutritional deficiencies, treatment of
secondary bacterial infections and provision of vitamin A. Importantly, given that measles present with lifelong immunity following
infection or vaccination, prevention through measles vaccination has a cardinal role for measles’ elimination. Indeed, public education
and vaccination led to an estimated 79% decrease in global measles deaths from 2000 to 2015. Nonetheless, the last two years have
seen a measles outbreak in several countries, partially due to the anti-vaccination movement. This article aims to present two cases
of measles in our hospital and highlight the pressing need for vaccination in order to eradicate a potentially fatal disease.

Abstract

Measles is an acute febrile illness, potentially fatal and highly contagious, which is transmitted through the respiratory mode. Fever
combined with one of the following: cough, coryza, conjunctivitis are the first manifestations of the disease. Koplik’s spots may
also appear on the buccal mucosa providing an opportunity to set the diagnosis even before the emergence of rash. Rash typically
appears 3–4 days after the onset of fever, initially on the face and behind the ears, and its appearance is associated with the peak
of the symptoms. Measles affects multiple systems, including the respiratory system, with pneumonia being one of the most lethal
complications. Management involves best supportive care, correction of dehydration and nutritional deficiencies, treatment of
secondary bacterial infections and provision of vitamin A. Importantly, given that measles present with lifelong immunity following
infection or vaccination, prevention through measles vaccination has a cardinal role for measles’ elimination. Indeed, public education
and vaccination led to an estimated 79% decrease in global measles deaths from 2000 to 2015. Nonetheless, the last two years have
seen a measles outbreak in several countries, partially due to the anti-vaccination movement. This article aims to present two cases
of measles in our hospital and highlight the pressing need for vaccination in order to eradicate a potentially fatal disease.

Get Citation

Keywords

measles, Koplik’s spots, rash, vaccination

About this article
Title

Measles pneumonitis

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 87, No 1 (2019)

Pages

63-67

Published online

2019-03-04

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2019.0010

Pubmed

30830960

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2019;87(1):63-67.

Keywords

measles
Koplik’s spots
rash
vaccination

Authors

Pinelopi Schoini
Theodoros Karampitsakos
Maria Avdikou
Aggeliki Athanasopoulou
Georgios Tsoukalas
Argyrios Tzouvelekis

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