open access

Vol 87, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-03-04
Submitted: 2018-10-30
Accepted: 2019-01-28
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Evaluation of the quality of life after surgical removal of lung cancer

Ewa Szeliga, Ewelina Czenczek-Lewandowska, Aldona Kontek, Andżelina Wolan- Nieroda, Agnieszka Guzik, Katarzyna Walicka- Cupryś
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2019.0003
·
Pubmed: 30830955
·
Adv Respir Med 2019;87(1):14-19.

open access

Vol 87, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-03-04
Submitted: 2018-10-30
Accepted: 2019-01-28

Abstract

Introduction: Morbidity and mortality attributed to lung cancer remain at high levels, especially where men are concerned.
The surgery for lung cancer involves removing neoplastic lesions in order to save the largest possible part of the healthy lung.
Of importance is also pre- and post-surgical rehabilitation. The aim of this thesis is to gauge the quality of life of the patients who
have had their lung cancer surgically removed.

Material and methods: The study was conducted on 72 patients (52 men and 20 women) after surgical removal of lung cancer.
The subjects were examined prior to, a week after and six months following surgery. The investigation employed the standardised
questionnaires to assess the quality of life, i.e. EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-LC13, as well as the visual analogue pain scale
(VAS). Statistical analyses were performed using the Anova Friedman test and Dunna test, and p-value calculated in multiple
comparisons with significance level assumed at p < 0.05.

Results: During six months after the operation, the quality of life deteriorated in relation to the one before operation as evidenced
by the functioning scale at the level of p < 0.001. Overall symptom scale, as well as symptomatic scale and the VAS scale showed
that some symptoms increased significantly in the early period after surgery p < 0.001, then with the passage of time, the
patients felt improvement, however, some of them, e.g. pain sensations can persist till six months after surgery.

Conclusions: Surgical removal of lung cancer is associated with a significant deterioration of the quality of life in the early period
after surgery and can persist till six months later.

Abstract

Introduction: Morbidity and mortality attributed to lung cancer remain at high levels, especially where men are concerned.
The surgery for lung cancer involves removing neoplastic lesions in order to save the largest possible part of the healthy lung.
Of importance is also pre- and post-surgical rehabilitation. The aim of this thesis is to gauge the quality of life of the patients who
have had their lung cancer surgically removed.

Material and methods: The study was conducted on 72 patients (52 men and 20 women) after surgical removal of lung cancer.
The subjects were examined prior to, a week after and six months following surgery. The investigation employed the standardised
questionnaires to assess the quality of life, i.e. EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-LC13, as well as the visual analogue pain scale
(VAS). Statistical analyses were performed using the Anova Friedman test and Dunna test, and p-value calculated in multiple
comparisons with significance level assumed at p < 0.05.

Results: During six months after the operation, the quality of life deteriorated in relation to the one before operation as evidenced
by the functioning scale at the level of p < 0.001. Overall symptom scale, as well as symptomatic scale and the VAS scale showed
that some symptoms increased significantly in the early period after surgery p < 0.001, then with the passage of time, the
patients felt improvement, however, some of them, e.g. pain sensations can persist till six months after surgery.

Conclusions: Surgical removal of lung cancer is associated with a significant deterioration of the quality of life in the early period
after surgery and can persist till six months later.

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Keywords

quality of life, lung cancer, thoracotomy, oncological patient

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About this article
Title

Evaluation of the quality of life after surgical removal of lung cancer

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 87, No 1 (2019)

Pages

14-19

Published online

2019-03-04

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2019.0003

Pubmed

30830955

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2019;87(1):14-19.

Keywords

quality of life
lung cancer
thoracotomy
oncological patient

Authors

Ewa Szeliga
Ewelina Czenczek-Lewandowska
Aldona Kontek
Andżelina Wolan- Nieroda
Agnieszka Guzik
Katarzyna Walicka- Cupryś

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