open access

Vol 86, No 6 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2018-12-30
Submitted: 2018-10-05
Accepted: 2018-12-28
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Nontuberculous mycobacteria strains isolated from patients between 2013 and 2017 in Poland. Our data with respect to the global trends

Sylwia Kwiatkowska, Ewa Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Maria Korzeniewska- Koseła, Dorota Filipczak, Paweł Gruszczyński, Anna Zabost, Magdalena Klatt, Małgorzata Sadkowska-Todys
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2018.0047
·
Pubmed: 30594996
·
Adv Respir Med 2018;86(6):291-298.

open access

Vol 86, No 6 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2018-12-30
Submitted: 2018-10-05
Accepted: 2018-12-28

Abstract

Introduction: During the last decades the prevalence of NTM infections has increased, especially in developed countries. The aim of the study was to provide an overview on all NTM isolated from clinical samples in Poland between 2013 and 2017.

Material and methods: The study comprised 2799 clinical specimens, mostly respiratory accessed in the reference laboratory of National Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases Research Institute in Warsaw and in the Wielkopolska Center of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery, Poland, 2013–2017.

Results: During the study period 35 species of NTM were isolated . The number of isolates increased almost 1.6-fold: from 420 in 2013 to 674 in 2017. M. kansasii, M. avium, M. xenopi, M. gordonae and M. intracellulare were the most common species. This NTM pattern was rather stable over the time. If the aggregated amount of all MAC species was taken into account they dominated over M. kansasii from 2015. M. avium and M. intracellulare were more often isolated from women, while M. kansasii, M. gordonae and M. xenopi predominated in men. Men and women were infected almost with the same frequency. In older patients 65+ women were in majority, quite opposite to those aged 25 to 64 years.

Conclusion: In Poland, like in other countries increased the frequency of isolated NTM. M. kansasii and M. avium were the most frequently identified species from clinical samples. Men and women were infected with NTM with the same frequency.

Abstract

Introduction: During the last decades the prevalence of NTM infections has increased, especially in developed countries. The aim of the study was to provide an overview on all NTM isolated from clinical samples in Poland between 2013 and 2017.

Material and methods: The study comprised 2799 clinical specimens, mostly respiratory accessed in the reference laboratory of National Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases Research Institute in Warsaw and in the Wielkopolska Center of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery, Poland, 2013–2017.

Results: During the study period 35 species of NTM were isolated . The number of isolates increased almost 1.6-fold: from 420 in 2013 to 674 in 2017. M. kansasii, M. avium, M. xenopi, M. gordonae and M. intracellulare were the most common species. This NTM pattern was rather stable over the time. If the aggregated amount of all MAC species was taken into account they dominated over M. kansasii from 2015. M. avium and M. intracellulare were more often isolated from women, while M. kansasii, M. gordonae and M. xenopi predominated in men. Men and women were infected almost with the same frequency. In older patients 65+ women were in majority, quite opposite to those aged 25 to 64 years.

Conclusion: In Poland, like in other countries increased the frequency of isolated NTM. M. kansasii and M. avium were the most frequently identified species from clinical samples. Men and women were infected with NTM with the same frequency.

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Keywords

NTM, M. kansassi, M. avium, infection

About this article
Title

Nontuberculous mycobacteria strains isolated from patients between 2013 and 2017 in Poland. Our data with respect to the global trends

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 86, No 6 (2018)

Pages

291-298

Published online

2018-12-30

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2018.0047

Pubmed

30594996

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2018;86(6):291-298.

Keywords

NTM
M. kansassi
M. avium
infection

Authors

Sylwia Kwiatkowska
Ewa Augustynowicz-Kopeć
Maria Korzeniewska- Koseła
Dorota Filipczak
Paweł Gruszczyński
Anna Zabost
Magdalena Klatt
Małgorzata Sadkowska-Todys

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