open access

Vol 87, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-03-04
Submitted: 2018-09-02
Accepted: 2019-01-05
Get Citation

The association between microcytic anemias and spirometric parameters

Zahra Imanizade, Hossein Danesh
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.a2019.0001
·
Pubmed: 30830953
·
Adv Respir Med 2019;87(1):1-6.

open access

Vol 87, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-03-04
Submitted: 2018-09-02
Accepted: 2019-01-05

Abstract

Introduction: Microcytic anemia is a type of anemia with smaller than normal red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia
are some of the major causes. The aim of the study was to compare the pulmonary function of the subjects with microcytic
anemia to the respective results of the normal population.

Material and methods: This was a cross-sectional study in Bandar Abbas, Iran, conducted on the patients attending yearly occupational
health checkups. Complete blood cell count and a standard spirogram were attained from each consenting participant
and occupational histories of exposure to dust, fumes, solvents, and noxious gases were obtained.

Results: At last, 2,199 subjects were included in the analysis, of which 335 cases had microcytic anemia. There was a significant
association between having microcytic anemia and forced vital capacity (FVC) reduction, and to a lesser degree, the reduction
of forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1). These parameters were also significantly increased together with the rise
of mean corpuscular volume (MCV) in the sample population.

Conclusion: It can be concluded that having microcytic anemia may reduce some spirometric parameters. Even though these
changes are small, adjusting for the reduced values can help prevent an overestimation of lung disorders, mostly in borderline cases.

Abstract

Introduction: Microcytic anemia is a type of anemia with smaller than normal red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia
are some of the major causes. The aim of the study was to compare the pulmonary function of the subjects with microcytic
anemia to the respective results of the normal population.

Material and methods: This was a cross-sectional study in Bandar Abbas, Iran, conducted on the patients attending yearly occupational
health checkups. Complete blood cell count and a standard spirogram were attained from each consenting participant
and occupational histories of exposure to dust, fumes, solvents, and noxious gases were obtained.

Results: At last, 2,199 subjects were included in the analysis, of which 335 cases had microcytic anemia. There was a significant
association between having microcytic anemia and forced vital capacity (FVC) reduction, and to a lesser degree, the reduction
of forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1). These parameters were also significantly increased together with the rise
of mean corpuscular volume (MCV) in the sample population.

Conclusion: It can be concluded that having microcytic anemia may reduce some spirometric parameters. Even though these
changes are small, adjusting for the reduced values can help prevent an overestimation of lung disorders, mostly in borderline cases.

Get Citation

Keywords

thalassemia, anemia, iron deficiency, respiratory function tests, spirometry

About this article
Title

The association between microcytic anemias and spirometric parameters

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 87, No 1 (2019)

Pages

1-6

Published online

2019-03-04

DOI

10.5603/ARM.a2019.0001

Pubmed

30830953

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2019;87(1):1-6.

Keywords

thalassemia
anemia
iron deficiency
respiratory function tests
spirometry

Authors

Zahra Imanizade
Hossein Danesh

References (24)
  1. DeLoughery TG, DeLoughery TG. Microcytic anemia. N Engl J Med. 2014; 371(14): 1324–1331.
  2. Barrett AN, Saminathan R, Choolani M. Thalassaemia screening and confirmation of carriers in parents. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2017; 39: 27–40.
  3. Higgs DR, Engel JD, Stamatoyannopoulos G. Thalassaemia. Lancet. 2012; 379(9813): 373–383.
  4. Hashemieh M, Javadzadeh M, Shirkavand A, et al. Lipid profile in minor thalassemic patients: a historical cohort study. Bangladesh Med Res Counc Bull. 2011; 37(1): 24–27.
  5. Galanello R, Origa R. Beta-thalassemia. Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2010; 5: 11.
  6. Harteveld CL, Higgs DR. Alpha-thalassaemia. Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2010; 5: 13.
  7. Warner MJ, Kamran MT. Anemia, iron deficiency. StatPearls Publishing, StatPearls. Treasure Island 2018.
  8. Leung TN, Lau TK, Chung TKh. Thalassaemia screening in pregnancy. Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol. 2005; 17(2): 129–134.
  9. Filosa A, Esposito V, Meoli I, et al. Evidence of a restrictive spirometric pattern in older thalassemic patients. Respiration. 2001; 68(3): 273–278.
  10. Noori NM, Keshavarz K, Shahriar M. Cardiac and pulmonary dysfunction in asymptomatic beta-thalassanemia major. Asian Cardiovasc Thorac Ann. 2012; 20(5): 555–559.
  11. Bourli E, Dimitriadou M, Economou M, et al. Restrictive pulmonary dysfunction and its predictors in young patients with β-thalassaemia major. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2012; 47(8): 801–807.
  12. Arteta M, Campbell A, Nouraie M, et al. Abnormal pulmonary function and associated risk factors in children and adolescents with sickle cell anemia. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2014; 36(3): 185–189.
  13. Robalo Nunes A, Tátá M. The impact of anaemia and iron deficiency in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A clinical overview. Rev Port Pneumol (2006). 2017; 23(3): 146–155.
  14. Abolghasemi H, Amid A, Zeinali S, et al. Thalassemia in Iran: epidemiology, prevention, and management. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol. 2007; 29(4): 233–238.
  15. Labbafinejad Y, Attarchi Ms, Danesh H, et al. Prevalence of sleep disorders and its effects on the work ability in a dairy company. Iran Occupational Health Journal. 2017; 14(2): 73–83.
  16. Miller MR, Hankinson J, Brusasco V, et al. ATS/ERS Task Force. Standardisation of spirometry. Eur Respir J. 2005; 26(2): 319–338.
  17. Quanjer PH, Stanojevic S, Cole TJ, et al. ERS Global Lung Function Initiative. Multi-ethnic reference values for spirometry for the 3-95-yr age range: the global lung function 2012 equations. Eur Respir J. 2012; 40(6): 1324–1343.
  18. Available from: https://www.ers-education.org/guidelines/global-lung-function-initiative/spirometry-tools/excel-sheet-calculator.aspx.
  19. Mentzer WC. Differentiation of iron deficiency from thalassaemia trait. Lancet. 1973; 1(7808): 882.
  20. Abu-Ekteish FM, Al-Rimawi HS, Al-Ali MK, et al. Pulmonary function tests in children with beta-thalassemia major. Chron Respir Dis. 2007; 4(1): 19–22.
  21. Portillo K, Belda J, Antón P, et al. [High frequency of anemia in COPD patients admitted in a tertiary hospital]. Rev Clin Esp. 2007; 207(8): 383–387.
  22. Stugiewicz M, Tkaczyszyn M, Kasztura M, et al. The influence of iron deficiency on the functioning of skeletal muscles: experimental evidence and clinical implications. Eur J Heart Fail. 2016; 18(7): 762–773.
  23. Zur B, Hornung A, Breuer J, et al. A novel hemoglobin, Bonn, causes falsely decreased oxygen saturation measurements in pulse oximetry. Clin Chem. 2008; 54(3): 594–596.
  24. Jing ZC, Xu XQ, Badesch DB, et al. Pulmonary function testing in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Respir Med. 2009; 103(8): 1136–1142.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

Czasopismo Pneumonologia i Alergologia Polska dostęne jest również w Ikamed - księgarnia medyczna

Wydawcą serwisu jest "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl