open access

Vol 86, No 5 (2018)
REVIEWS
Published online: 2018-10-30
Submitted: 2018-08-26
Accepted: 2018-10-15
Get Citation

Radiology findings and non-invasive ventilation response

Aysun Isiklar, Sibel Ocak Serin, Antonio M. Esquinas
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.2018.0038
·
Pubmed: 30378652
·
Adv Respir Med 2018;86(5):240-244.

open access

Vol 86, No 5 (2018)
REVIEWS
Published online: 2018-10-30
Submitted: 2018-08-26
Accepted: 2018-10-15

Abstract

There is a considerable variation in NIV among hospitals, regions and countries although it is a simple and useful method. The
patient should be monitored via subjective response (respiratory distress, consciousness, problems related to mask and airflow),
physiological responses (respiration rate, respiratory effort, air leakage) and patient-ventilator compliance (gas exchange, pulse
oximetry, arterial blood gases). Normalization in respiration rate within 1 or 2 hours after initiation of treatment is one of the most
important markers for recovery. The goal is to maintain respiration rate between 20 and 30 breaths/minute. Reduction in intercostal
and supraclavicular retractions, paradoxical respiration and sympathetic activity indicate success of treatment. Arterial blood
gases are measured within first 2 hours in order to assess pH and CO2; and as needed thereafter. In general, NIV is assessed by
arterial blood gases, hemodynamic parameters and several laboratory tests. There is limited number of studies in NIV. Here, we
aimed to assess radiological implications of gas distribution within lung tissue during NIV therapy.

Abstract

There is a considerable variation in NIV among hospitals, regions and countries although it is a simple and useful method. The
patient should be monitored via subjective response (respiratory distress, consciousness, problems related to mask and airflow),
physiological responses (respiration rate, respiratory effort, air leakage) and patient-ventilator compliance (gas exchange, pulse
oximetry, arterial blood gases). Normalization in respiration rate within 1 or 2 hours after initiation of treatment is one of the most
important markers for recovery. The goal is to maintain respiration rate between 20 and 30 breaths/minute. Reduction in intercostal
and supraclavicular retractions, paradoxical respiration and sympathetic activity indicate success of treatment. Arterial blood
gases are measured within first 2 hours in order to assess pH and CO2; and as needed thereafter. In general, NIV is assessed by
arterial blood gases, hemodynamic parameters and several laboratory tests. There is limited number of studies in NIV. Here, we
aimed to assess radiological implications of gas distribution within lung tissue during NIV therapy.

Get Citation

Keywords

non-invasive ventilation, NIV, radiology findings

About this article
Title

Radiology findings and non-invasive ventilation response

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 86, No 5 (2018)

Pages

240-244

Published online

2018-10-30

DOI

10.5603/ARM.2018.0038

Pubmed

30378652

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2018;86(5):240-244.

Keywords

non-invasive ventilation
NIV
radiology findings

Authors

Aysun Isiklar
Sibel Ocak Serin
Antonio M. Esquinas

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