open access

Vol 86, No 5 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2018-10-30
Submitted: 2018-06-27
Accepted: 2018-09-08
Get Citation

HIV status among presumptive tuberculosis cases attending tertiary care centre in South India

Manju Rajaram, Adimulam Ganga Ravindra, Dharm Prakash Dwivedi, Jayalakshmi Ramakrishnan, Palanivel Chinnakali, Madhusmita Mohanty Mohapatra
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.2018.0033
·
Pubmed: 30378647
·
Adv Respir Med 2018;86(5):211-214.

open access

Vol 86, No 5 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2018-10-30
Submitted: 2018-06-27
Accepted: 2018-09-08

Abstract

Introduction: In India, to increase human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) case detection, the National Technical Working Group on
TB /HIV had made it mandatory to screen for HIV infection among presumptive tuberculosis (TB) cases.

Material and methods: Our study was a cross-sectional study, conducted between June 2015 and December 2016 in a tertiary
care institute (JIPMER), in South India, to estimate the prevalence of HIV among presumptive TB cases.

Results: Among the 964 presumptive TB cases who attended pulmonary medicine OPD, 189 patients were sputum acid-fast
bacilli (AFB) positive. Among the 189 sputum positive cases, 9 were HIV positive. Of the 964 presumptive TB cases, 879 gave
consent for HIV testing and 33 (3.7%) turned out to be HIV positive. If only sputum positive cases had been screened for HIV,
we would have missed 24 new HIV positive cases. The number needed to screen was 27 among presumptive TB cases and 18
among TB patients.

Conclusions: The uptake of HIV testing (91%) and the diagnostic yield of 3.7% of HIV positive cases among the presumptive
TB patients is quite high compared to that of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) mechanism of Puducherry.
This reinforces the need to screen all the presumptive cases for HIV infection, to increase HIV case detection so that
anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can be initiated early.

Abstract

Introduction: In India, to increase human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) case detection, the National Technical Working Group on
TB /HIV had made it mandatory to screen for HIV infection among presumptive tuberculosis (TB) cases.

Material and methods: Our study was a cross-sectional study, conducted between June 2015 and December 2016 in a tertiary
care institute (JIPMER), in South India, to estimate the prevalence of HIV among presumptive TB cases.

Results: Among the 964 presumptive TB cases who attended pulmonary medicine OPD, 189 patients were sputum acid-fast
bacilli (AFB) positive. Among the 189 sputum positive cases, 9 were HIV positive. Of the 964 presumptive TB cases, 879 gave
consent for HIV testing and 33 (3.7%) turned out to be HIV positive. If only sputum positive cases had been screened for HIV,
we would have missed 24 new HIV positive cases. The number needed to screen was 27 among presumptive TB cases and 18
among TB patients.

Conclusions: The uptake of HIV testing (91%) and the diagnostic yield of 3.7% of HIV positive cases among the presumptive
TB patients is quite high compared to that of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) mechanism of Puducherry.
This reinforces the need to screen all the presumptive cases for HIV infection, to increase HIV case detection so that
anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can be initiated early.

Get Citation

Keywords

presumptive TB cases, HIV testing, Provider-Initiated HIV Testing and Counseling, sputum positive cases, co-infection

About this article
Title

HIV status among presumptive tuberculosis cases attending tertiary care centre in South India

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 86, No 5 (2018)

Pages

211-214

Published online

2018-10-30

DOI

10.5603/ARM.2018.0033

Pubmed

30378647

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2018;86(5):211-214.

Keywords

presumptive TB cases
HIV testing
Provider-Initiated HIV Testing and Counseling
sputum positive cases
co-infection

Authors

Manju Rajaram
Adimulam Ganga Ravindra
Dharm Prakash Dwivedi
Jayalakshmi Ramakrishnan
Palanivel Chinnakali
Madhusmita Mohanty Mohapatra

References (8)
  1. India TB Report 2018. New Delhi: Central TB Division, Directorate General of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare; 2018 Mar.
  2. WHO policy on collaborative TB/HIV activities. Guidelines for national programmes and other stakeholders. World Health Organization; 2012.
  3. Srikantiah P, Lin R, Walusimbi M, et al. Elevated HIV seroprevalence and risk behavior among Ugandan TB suspects: implications for HIV testing and prevention. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2007; 11(2): 168–174.
  4. Deribew A, Negussu N, Melaku Z, et al. Investigation outcomes of tuberculosis suspects in the health centers of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. PLoS One. 2011; 6(4): e18614.
  5. National Guidelines for HIV Testing. National AIDS Control Organisation, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare; 2015.
  6. Palanivel C, Kumar AMV, Mahalakshmi T, et al. Uptake of HIV testing and HIV positivity among presumptive tuberculosis patients at Puducherry, South India. Public Health Action. 2013; 3(3): 220–223.
  7. Kumar AMv, Gupta D, Kumar A, et al. HIV Testing among Patients with Presumptive Tuberculosis: How Do We Implement in a Routine Programmatic Setting? Results of a Large Operational Research from India. PLoS One. 2016; 11(5): e0156487.
  8. 90-90-90 An ambitious treatment target to help end the AIDS epidemic. UNAIDS; 2014.

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