open access

Vol 85, No 6 (2017)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2017-12-14
Submitted: 2017-05-05
Accepted: 2017-10-08
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Actively caseating endobronchial tuberculosis successfully treated with intermittent chemotherapy without corticosteroid: a report of 2 cases

Manoj Kumar Panigrahi, Gourahari Pradhan, Pritinanada Mishra, Prasanta Raghab Mohapatra
DOI: 10.5603/ARM.2017.0055
·
Pubmed: 29288481
·
Adv Respir Med 2017;85(6):322-327.

open access

Vol 85, No 6 (2017)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2017-12-14
Submitted: 2017-05-05
Accepted: 2017-10-08

Abstract

Tuberculous infection of the tracheobronchial tree confirmed by microbiological or histopathological evidence with or without parenchymal involvement is known as endobronchial tuberculosis. Chronic cough is the predominant symptom. Expectorated sputum examination for acid fast bacilli is often negative leading to delay in diagnosis. Therefore, bronchoscopy is crucial for early diagnosis and evaluation of the extent of disease. Bronchostenosis is a significant complication of endobronchial tuberculosis that may be present at the time of diagnosis or develops during the course of treatment. Previously, corticosteroids have been used along with antitubercular therapy to prevent or reduce the extent of bronchostenosis; however, their role is debatable as bronchostenosis often develops despite the use of corticosteroids. Furthermore, the duration of treatment varied from 6–9 months of daily therapy in previous series and little is known about efficacy of intermittent antituberculous therapy. Here we report two cases of actively caseating endobronchial tuberculosis successfully managed with six months of intermittent oral antitubercular therapy without corticosteroids.

Abstract

Tuberculous infection of the tracheobronchial tree confirmed by microbiological or histopathological evidence with or without parenchymal involvement is known as endobronchial tuberculosis. Chronic cough is the predominant symptom. Expectorated sputum examination for acid fast bacilli is often negative leading to delay in diagnosis. Therefore, bronchoscopy is crucial for early diagnosis and evaluation of the extent of disease. Bronchostenosis is a significant complication of endobronchial tuberculosis that may be present at the time of diagnosis or develops during the course of treatment. Previously, corticosteroids have been used along with antitubercular therapy to prevent or reduce the extent of bronchostenosis; however, their role is debatable as bronchostenosis often develops despite the use of corticosteroids. Furthermore, the duration of treatment varied from 6–9 months of daily therapy in previous series and little is known about efficacy of intermittent antituberculous therapy. Here we report two cases of actively caseating endobronchial tuberculosis successfully managed with six months of intermittent oral antitubercular therapy without corticosteroids.
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Keywords

tuberculosis, endobronchial tuberculosis, antitubercular drugs, corticosteroid

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About this article
Title

Actively caseating endobronchial tuberculosis successfully treated with intermittent chemotherapy without corticosteroid: a report of 2 cases

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 85, No 6 (2017)

Pages

322-327

Published online

2017-12-14

DOI

10.5603/ARM.2017.0055

Pubmed

29288481

Bibliographic record

Adv Respir Med 2017;85(6):322-327.

Keywords

tuberculosis
endobronchial tuberculosis
antitubercular drugs
corticosteroid

Authors

Manoj Kumar Panigrahi
Gourahari Pradhan
Pritinanada Mishra
Prasanta Raghab Mohapatra

References (16)
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