open access

Vol 83, No 4 (2015)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2015-07-09
Get Citation

Quality of life and health behaviours of patients with tuberculosis — sex differences

Beata Katarzyna Jankowska-Polanska, Małgorzata Kamińska, Izabella Uchmanowicz, Anna Rycombel
DOI: 10.5603/PiAP.2015.0046
·
Pubmed: 26166788
·
Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2015;83(4):256-265.

open access

Vol 83, No 4 (2015)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2015-07-09

Abstract

Introduction: Despite the introduction of effective antituberculosis drugs, tuberculosis (TB) is still a serious health problem and one of the most significant causes of death among infectious diseases. Current publications indicate an increase of tuberculosis cases among smokers, diabetics, malnurished subjects and those abusing alcohol and drugs. In the literature, there are only few studies raising the topic of the quality of life (QoL), stress management and health behaviour among patients with tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate QoL of patients with tuberculosis taking into account gender differences. In the study, the analysis of knowledge, health behaviour and stress management among TB patients depending on sex was carried out.

Material and methods: The study included 80 subjects diagnosed with TB (including 38 females) who were hospitalised at the Regional Hospital Centre of Kotlina Jeleniogórska, Medical Unit Wysoka Łąka, Pulmonology and Phthisiology Department in Kowary between August 2012 and January 2013. The following questionnaires were used in the study: Mini-COPE — evaluating stress management, WHOQoL — assessing the quality of life of patients, IZZ — assessing health behaviour.

Results: A difference with regards to sociodemographic profile between females and males was observed. Half of the women surveyed were working (50% vs 19% of men), whereas half of men were entitled to unemployment benefit (50% vs 18.4% of women). More than half of women lived with their family (55.3%), whereas 47.6% of men lived alone. The majority of the subjects consumed alcohol occasionally (60.2% of women vs 45.2% of men), but as many as 31% of male patients vs 7.9% of females admitted that they consumed alcohol frequently. Among the respondents, people who consumed alcohol occasionally dominated (60.2% women vs. 45.2% of men), but as many as 31% of male patients vs. 7.9% of women admitted to consume alcohol frequently. Quality of life (QoL) assessment has shown no statistically significant differences between the sexes in this field. The respondents rated lowest their QoL in the physical domain, 12.4 ± 3.1 (12.9 ± 3.0 women vs. 11.8 ± 3.1 men) and 12.6 ± 2.4 in the environmental domain (13.1 ± 2.3 women vs 12.1± 2.4 men). Women received a higher rating of health behaviour on all subscales of the IZZ questionnaire, with the highest score in the prevention behaviour subscale (3.6 ± 0.7) and the lowest in the subscale of proper eating habits (3.1 ± 0.8). In men the highest score of health behaviour was observed in the subscale of positive mental attitude (3.1 ± 1.0) and the lowest in the subscale of proper eating habits (2.5 ± 0.8).

Conclusions: 1. There are differences between sociodemographic profile of TB patients: women are younger, better educated, economically active and more likely to remain in relationships; 2. There is no difference in QoL of TB patients between the sexes, whereas there are differences in the strategies of stress management and in applied health behavior; 3. Differences between genders indicate the need for matching treatment and preventive action for different patients profiles based on the cooperation of doctors, social workers, therapists, and psychologists.

Abstract

Introduction: Despite the introduction of effective antituberculosis drugs, tuberculosis (TB) is still a serious health problem and one of the most significant causes of death among infectious diseases. Current publications indicate an increase of tuberculosis cases among smokers, diabetics, malnurished subjects and those abusing alcohol and drugs. In the literature, there are only few studies raising the topic of the quality of life (QoL), stress management and health behaviour among patients with tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate QoL of patients with tuberculosis taking into account gender differences. In the study, the analysis of knowledge, health behaviour and stress management among TB patients depending on sex was carried out.

Material and methods: The study included 80 subjects diagnosed with TB (including 38 females) who were hospitalised at the Regional Hospital Centre of Kotlina Jeleniogórska, Medical Unit Wysoka Łąka, Pulmonology and Phthisiology Department in Kowary between August 2012 and January 2013. The following questionnaires were used in the study: Mini-COPE — evaluating stress management, WHOQoL — assessing the quality of life of patients, IZZ — assessing health behaviour.

Results: A difference with regards to sociodemographic profile between females and males was observed. Half of the women surveyed were working (50% vs 19% of men), whereas half of men were entitled to unemployment benefit (50% vs 18.4% of women). More than half of women lived with their family (55.3%), whereas 47.6% of men lived alone. The majority of the subjects consumed alcohol occasionally (60.2% of women vs 45.2% of men), but as many as 31% of male patients vs 7.9% of females admitted that they consumed alcohol frequently. Among the respondents, people who consumed alcohol occasionally dominated (60.2% women vs. 45.2% of men), but as many as 31% of male patients vs. 7.9% of women admitted to consume alcohol frequently. Quality of life (QoL) assessment has shown no statistically significant differences between the sexes in this field. The respondents rated lowest their QoL in the physical domain, 12.4 ± 3.1 (12.9 ± 3.0 women vs. 11.8 ± 3.1 men) and 12.6 ± 2.4 in the environmental domain (13.1 ± 2.3 women vs 12.1± 2.4 men). Women received a higher rating of health behaviour on all subscales of the IZZ questionnaire, with the highest score in the prevention behaviour subscale (3.6 ± 0.7) and the lowest in the subscale of proper eating habits (3.1 ± 0.8). In men the highest score of health behaviour was observed in the subscale of positive mental attitude (3.1 ± 1.0) and the lowest in the subscale of proper eating habits (2.5 ± 0.8).

Conclusions: 1. There are differences between sociodemographic profile of TB patients: women are younger, better educated, economically active and more likely to remain in relationships; 2. There is no difference in QoL of TB patients between the sexes, whereas there are differences in the strategies of stress management and in applied health behavior; 3. Differences between genders indicate the need for matching treatment and preventive action for different patients profiles based on the cooperation of doctors, social workers, therapists, and psychologists.

Get Citation

Keywords

tuberculosis, quality of life, health behaviours, coping with stress

About this article
Title

Quality of life and health behaviours of patients with tuberculosis — sex differences

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 83, No 4 (2015)

Pages

256-265

DOI

10.5603/PiAP.2015.0046

Pubmed

26166788

Bibliographic record

Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2015;83(4):256-265.

Keywords

tuberculosis
quality of life
health behaviours
coping with stress

Authors

Beata Katarzyna Jankowska-Polanska
Małgorzata Kamińska
Izabella Uchmanowicz
Anna Rycombel

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

Czasopismo Pneumonologia i Alergologia Polska dostęne jest również w Ikamed - księgarnia medyczna

Wydawcą serwisu jest "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl