open access

Vol 83, No 2 (2015)
REVIEWS
Submitted: 2015-03-10
Accepted: 2015-03-10
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Thixotropy of nasal medications — its role in clinical practice

Maciej Koźmiński, Maciej Kupczyk
DOI: 10.5603/PiAP.2015.0025
·
Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2015;83(2):157-163.

open access

Vol 83, No 2 (2015)
REVIEWS
Submitted: 2015-03-10
Accepted: 2015-03-10

Abstract

Optimal medication should be characterized by good bioavailability, rapid onset of action, a long period of therapeutic activity, with preserved high safety profile and the lowest possible risk of side effects. Therefore, in addition to traditional drug administration routes, such as oral or injection, novel methods for drug applications, for example in the form of a nasal application have been developed. Because of the anatomy of the nose, drugs administered intranasally can be rapidly absorbed and, depending on the nature of the active substance, may act locally on the mucosa or can have a significant systemic effect. Most nasal drugs are developed in the form of solution administered as aerosol. In some cases, these solutions are thixotropic. They are able to change their physical properties under agitation to facilitate supply of the drug and its adhesion to the mucosa. Intranasal corticosteroids represent the mainstay of treatment for any form of chronic allergic rhinitis (AR) and moderate to severe periodic AR, especially with impaired nasal obstruction and frequent occurrence of symptoms. The article discusses the rheological properties of intranasal corticosteroids, their role in therapy and efficacy in the everyday clinical practice.

Abstract

Optimal medication should be characterized by good bioavailability, rapid onset of action, a long period of therapeutic activity, with preserved high safety profile and the lowest possible risk of side effects. Therefore, in addition to traditional drug administration routes, such as oral or injection, novel methods for drug applications, for example in the form of a nasal application have been developed. Because of the anatomy of the nose, drugs administered intranasally can be rapidly absorbed and, depending on the nature of the active substance, may act locally on the mucosa or can have a significant systemic effect. Most nasal drugs are developed in the form of solution administered as aerosol. In some cases, these solutions are thixotropic. They are able to change their physical properties under agitation to facilitate supply of the drug and its adhesion to the mucosa. Intranasal corticosteroids represent the mainstay of treatment for any form of chronic allergic rhinitis (AR) and moderate to severe periodic AR, especially with impaired nasal obstruction and frequent occurrence of symptoms. The article discusses the rheological properties of intranasal corticosteroids, their role in therapy and efficacy in the everyday clinical practice.

Get Citation

Keywords

nasal spray, thixotropy, adhesion, nasal glucocorticosteroids

About this article
Title

Thixotropy of nasal medications — its role in clinical practice

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 83, No 2 (2015)

Pages

157-163

DOI

10.5603/PiAP.2015.0025

Bibliographic record

Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2015;83(2):157-163.

Keywords

nasal spray
thixotropy
adhesion
nasal glucocorticosteroids

Authors

Maciej Koźmiński
Maciej Kupczyk

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