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Vol 77, No 1 (2009)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2008-12-19
Submitted: 2013-02-22
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Treatment outcomes in culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis

Izabela Siemion-Szcześniak, Jan Kuś
Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2009;77(1):11-22.

open access

Vol 77, No 1 (2009)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2008-12-19
Submitted: 2013-02-22

Abstract


Introduction: The aim of the study was to evaluate treatment outcomes in sputum culture positive patients with tuberculosis in three Polish provinces (Warsaw, Gdansk and Siedlce Provinces) in 1995 and again in 2000. We also assessed whether the implementation of the Directly Observed Therapy Short Course (DOTS) strategy in the former Gdansk Province led to improved outcomes compared to the outcomes observed in 1995, when this strategy was not being followed.
Material and methods: We started the study by reviewing microbiology registers covering the years 1995 and 2000 from all the tuberculosis laboratories in three provinces (Warsaw, Gdansk and Siedlce Provinces) and identified sputum culture positive patients. We then reviewed inpatient and outpatient medical records of patients who had been with pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed and confirmed by bacteriology in 1995 and 2000. Treatment outcomes were evaluated in accordance with the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommendations and classified as: cure, treatment completed, default, treatment failure, death or other.
Results: A total of 708 patients were included in the study: 373 diagnosed in 1995 and 335 diagnosed in 2000. According to the WHO criteria, the treatment success rate (the sum of cures and treatment completions) in 1995 and 2000 was 58.8% and 54.0%, the default rate was 15.5% and 17.9%, the failure rate was 2.4% and 2.7% and the death rate was 5.6% and 6.3%, respectively. The rate of outcomes classified as “other” was 18.2% and 22.1%, respectively. Following the implementation of the DOTS strategy in Gdansk Province, treatment outcomes in significantly improved in 2000 compared to the year 1995. The treatment success rate was 89.6% vs 69.3% (p = 0.0037), the default rate was 0.0% vs. 14.7% (p = 0.0005) and the death rate was 0.0% vs. 9.3% (p = 0.0184).
Conclusions: The treatment success rate (the rate of cures and treatment completers) in 1995 and 2000 was 58.8% and 54.0% and was lower than that recommended by WHO (at least 85%). The results demonstrated that the treatment outcomes in the former Gdansk Province in 2000, following the implementation of the DOTS strategy, were significantly better than those in 1995, when the strategy was not being followed. Treatment success was observed in 89.6% and 69.3% of the patients, respectively (p = 0.0037).

Abstract


Introduction: The aim of the study was to evaluate treatment outcomes in sputum culture positive patients with tuberculosis in three Polish provinces (Warsaw, Gdansk and Siedlce Provinces) in 1995 and again in 2000. We also assessed whether the implementation of the Directly Observed Therapy Short Course (DOTS) strategy in the former Gdansk Province led to improved outcomes compared to the outcomes observed in 1995, when this strategy was not being followed.
Material and methods: We started the study by reviewing microbiology registers covering the years 1995 and 2000 from all the tuberculosis laboratories in three provinces (Warsaw, Gdansk and Siedlce Provinces) and identified sputum culture positive patients. We then reviewed inpatient and outpatient medical records of patients who had been with pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed and confirmed by bacteriology in 1995 and 2000. Treatment outcomes were evaluated in accordance with the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommendations and classified as: cure, treatment completed, default, treatment failure, death or other.
Results: A total of 708 patients were included in the study: 373 diagnosed in 1995 and 335 diagnosed in 2000. According to the WHO criteria, the treatment success rate (the sum of cures and treatment completions) in 1995 and 2000 was 58.8% and 54.0%, the default rate was 15.5% and 17.9%, the failure rate was 2.4% and 2.7% and the death rate was 5.6% and 6.3%, respectively. The rate of outcomes classified as “other” was 18.2% and 22.1%, respectively. Following the implementation of the DOTS strategy in Gdansk Province, treatment outcomes in significantly improved in 2000 compared to the year 1995. The treatment success rate was 89.6% vs 69.3% (p = 0.0037), the default rate was 0.0% vs. 14.7% (p = 0.0005) and the death rate was 0.0% vs. 9.3% (p = 0.0184).
Conclusions: The treatment success rate (the rate of cures and treatment completers) in 1995 and 2000 was 58.8% and 54.0% and was lower than that recommended by WHO (at least 85%). The results demonstrated that the treatment outcomes in the former Gdansk Province in 2000, following the implementation of the DOTS strategy, were significantly better than those in 1995, when the strategy was not being followed. Treatment success was observed in 89.6% and 69.3% of the patients, respectively (p = 0.0037).
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Keywords

culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis; treatment outcome; adherence; DOTS strategy; cohort analysis

About this article
Title

Treatment outcomes in culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 77, No 1 (2009)

Pages

11-22

Published online

2008-12-19

Bibliographic record

Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2009;77(1):11-22.

Keywords

culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis
treatment outcome
adherence
DOTS strategy
cohort analysis

Authors

Izabela Siemion-Szcześniak
Jan Kuś

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