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Vol 78, No 2 (2010)
REVIEWS
Published online: 2010-03-19
Submitted: 2013-02-22
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Lung mycobacteriosis - clinical presentation, diagnostics and treatment

Ewelina Wilińska, Monika Szturmowicz
Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2010;78(2):138-147.

open access

Vol 78, No 2 (2010)
REVIEWS
Published online: 2010-03-19
Submitted: 2013-02-22

Abstract

Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a group of bacteria that may cause human disease mycobacteriosis, but do not cause tuberculosis or leprosy. NTM are acquired through environmental exposure to water, aerosols, soil, dust and are transfered to human through inhalation, ingestion, and skin lesions, due to injuries, surgical procedures, or intravenous catheters. People with suppressed immune response, with pre-existing lung damage in the course of various lung diseases are most likely to be affected. There is no evidence of person-to-person spread of these diseases. A variety of manifestations of NTM infection have been described, but the lungs remain the most commonly involved site. Molecular methods allow the quicker differentiation of NTM from TB isolates and help to identify new NTM species. The purpose of this article is to review the common clinical manifestations of NTM lung disease, the conditions associated with NTM lung disease, diagnostic criteria and treatment of the most frequent species of NTM.
Pneumonol. Alergol. Pol. 2010; 78, 2: 138-147

Abstract

Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a group of bacteria that may cause human disease mycobacteriosis, but do not cause tuberculosis or leprosy. NTM are acquired through environmental exposure to water, aerosols, soil, dust and are transfered to human through inhalation, ingestion, and skin lesions, due to injuries, surgical procedures, or intravenous catheters. People with suppressed immune response, with pre-existing lung damage in the course of various lung diseases are most likely to be affected. There is no evidence of person-to-person spread of these diseases. A variety of manifestations of NTM infection have been described, but the lungs remain the most commonly involved site. Molecular methods allow the quicker differentiation of NTM from TB isolates and help to identify new NTM species. The purpose of this article is to review the common clinical manifestations of NTM lung disease, the conditions associated with NTM lung disease, diagnostic criteria and treatment of the most frequent species of NTM.
Pneumonol. Alergol. Pol. 2010; 78, 2: 138-147
Get Citation

Keywords

nontuberculous mycobacteria; mycobacteriosis; Mycobacterium avium complex; Mycobacterium kansasii; antituberculous drugs

About this article
Title

Lung mycobacteriosis - clinical presentation, diagnostics and treatment

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 78, No 2 (2010)

Pages

138-147

Published online

2010-03-19

Bibliographic record

Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2010;78(2):138-147.

Keywords

nontuberculous mycobacteria
mycobacteriosis
Mycobacterium avium complex
Mycobacterium kansasii
antituberculous drugs

Authors

Ewelina Wilińska
Monika Szturmowicz

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