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Vol 78, No 4 (2010)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2010-07-08
Submitted: 2013-02-22
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Phenotypic characterization of pyrazinamide-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated in Poland

Agnieszka Napiórkowska, Ewa Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Zofia Zwolska
Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2010;78(4):256-262.

open access

Vol 78, No 4 (2010)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2010-07-08
Submitted: 2013-02-22

Abstract


Introduction: Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an important first-line antituberculous drug, which is applied together with INH, RMP, EMB and SM. This drug plays a unique role in the first phase of TB therapy because it is active within macrophages and kills tubercule bacilli. Testing of the resistibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to PZA is technically difficult because PZA is active only at acid pH. Therefore routine drug resistibility testing of M. tuberculosis for PZA is not performed in many laboratories. The objective of our study was to estimate the resistibility for PZA among M. tuberculosis isolates from polish patients in 2000-2008 years.
Material and methods: We analyzed M. tuberculosis strains with different resistibility to first-line antituberculous drugs. The strains were isolated from 1909 patients with tuberculosis. The strains were examined for PZA resistibility by the radiometric Bactec 460-TB method. The PZA-resistant strains were examined for following MIC PZA for drug concentration: 100, 300, 600, 900 μg/mL.
Results: PZA resistance among M. tuberculosis strains was found in 6.7% untreated patients and in 22.2% previously treated patients (p < 0.001). In both groups resistance to PZA was correlated with drug resistance for INH + RMP + SM + EMB in 32.7% untreated patients and in 34.5% previously treated ones (p < 0.8). The PZA-monoresistant strains were observed in 20.8% untreated patients groups. Among resistant strains: in 3.4% MIC for PZA was > 100 μg/mL, in 11.6% ≥ 300 μg/mL, in 8.9% ≥ 600 μg/mL and in 76% ≥ 900 μg /mL.
Conclusions: Among M. tuberculosis strains PZA resistance was found in 6.7% of untreated patients and in 22.2% of previously treated patients. Among the PZA-resistant strains very high MIC value for PZA (≥ 900 μg/mL) was revealed for 76% M. tuberculosis strains.
Pneumonol. Alergol. Pol. 2010; 78, 4: 256-262

Abstract


Introduction: Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an important first-line antituberculous drug, which is applied together with INH, RMP, EMB and SM. This drug plays a unique role in the first phase of TB therapy because it is active within macrophages and kills tubercule bacilli. Testing of the resistibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to PZA is technically difficult because PZA is active only at acid pH. Therefore routine drug resistibility testing of M. tuberculosis for PZA is not performed in many laboratories. The objective of our study was to estimate the resistibility for PZA among M. tuberculosis isolates from polish patients in 2000-2008 years.
Material and methods: We analyzed M. tuberculosis strains with different resistibility to first-line antituberculous drugs. The strains were isolated from 1909 patients with tuberculosis. The strains were examined for PZA resistibility by the radiometric Bactec 460-TB method. The PZA-resistant strains were examined for following MIC PZA for drug concentration: 100, 300, 600, 900 μg/mL.
Results: PZA resistance among M. tuberculosis strains was found in 6.7% untreated patients and in 22.2% previously treated patients (p < 0.001). In both groups resistance to PZA was correlated with drug resistance for INH + RMP + SM + EMB in 32.7% untreated patients and in 34.5% previously treated ones (p < 0.8). The PZA-monoresistant strains were observed in 20.8% untreated patients groups. Among resistant strains: in 3.4% MIC for PZA was > 100 μg/mL, in 11.6% ≥ 300 μg/mL, in 8.9% ≥ 600 μg/mL and in 76% ≥ 900 μg /mL.
Conclusions: Among M. tuberculosis strains PZA resistance was found in 6.7% of untreated patients and in 22.2% of previously treated patients. Among the PZA-resistant strains very high MIC value for PZA (≥ 900 μg/mL) was revealed for 76% M. tuberculosis strains.
Pneumonol. Alergol. Pol. 2010; 78, 4: 256-262
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Keywords

tuberculosis; Mycobacterium tuberculosis; PZA-resistance

About this article
Title

Phenotypic characterization of pyrazinamide-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated in Poland

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 78, No 4 (2010)

Pages

256-262

Published online

2010-07-08

Bibliographic record

Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2010;78(4):256-262.

Keywords

tuberculosis
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
PZA-resistance

Authors

Agnieszka Napiórkowska
Ewa Augustynowicz-Kopeć
Zofia Zwolska

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