open access

Vol 79, No 5 (2011)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2011-08-22
Submitted: 2013-02-22
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An analysis of the causes of mortality and co-morbidities in hospitalised patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Renata Rubinsztajn, Ryszarda Chazan
Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2011;79(5):343-346.

open access

Vol 79, No 5 (2011)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2011-08-22
Submitted: 2013-02-22

Abstract

Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Patients with COPD often suffer from various co-morbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, cachexia and anaemia, which are a consequence of systemic inflammation. The co-morbidities of COPD are believed to be associated with a more severe course of the underlying disease and with a poorer prognosis. It is being disputed whether extrapulmonary co-morbidities or respiratory complications are the main cause of mortality in patients with COPD. The aim of the study was to analyse the causes of death and co-morbidities in COPD patients who had died during hospitalisation at the Department of Internal Medicine, Pneumonology and Allergy, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland, between 2004 and 2008.
Material and methods: We analysed 266 consecutive medical records of COPD patients who had died during hospitalisation. They included 179 men (67%) and 87 women (33%). The mean age at death was 73 ± 8 years (women: 74 ± 9 years).
Results: The causes of death in the analysed group of patients included: acute exacerbation of COPD (n = 81 [81%]; 49 men and 32 women), pneumonia (n = 67 [25%]; 50 men and 17 women), lung cancer (n = 50 [19%]; 32 men and 18 women), ischaemic heart disease (n = 20 [7%]; 15 men and 5 women), heart failure (n = 14 [5%]; 8 men and 6 women) and other causes (n = 34 [14%]). Most of the deaths from lung cancer were observed among younger patients (p = 0.002), while most of the deaths from pneumonia among older patients (p = 0.02). The most common co-morbidities in the study population included: chronic heart failure (n = 169), hypertension (n = 103), ischaemic heart disease (n = 102), type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 55), renal failure (n = 43), benign prostatic hyperplasia (n = 36), lower limb atherosclerosis (n = 28), osteoporosis (n = 19) and anaemia (n = 14).
Conclusions: Respiratory tract pathologies, such as acute exacerbation of COPD, pneumonia and lung cancer, were the most common causes of death in the study population, while cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus were the most common co-morbidities seen in these patients.
Pneumonol. Alergol. Pol. 2011; 79, 5: 343–346

Abstract

Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Patients with COPD often suffer from various co-morbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, cachexia and anaemia, which are a consequence of systemic inflammation. The co-morbidities of COPD are believed to be associated with a more severe course of the underlying disease and with a poorer prognosis. It is being disputed whether extrapulmonary co-morbidities or respiratory complications are the main cause of mortality in patients with COPD. The aim of the study was to analyse the causes of death and co-morbidities in COPD patients who had died during hospitalisation at the Department of Internal Medicine, Pneumonology and Allergy, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland, between 2004 and 2008.
Material and methods: We analysed 266 consecutive medical records of COPD patients who had died during hospitalisation. They included 179 men (67%) and 87 women (33%). The mean age at death was 73 ± 8 years (women: 74 ± 9 years).
Results: The causes of death in the analysed group of patients included: acute exacerbation of COPD (n = 81 [81%]; 49 men and 32 women), pneumonia (n = 67 [25%]; 50 men and 17 women), lung cancer (n = 50 [19%]; 32 men and 18 women), ischaemic heart disease (n = 20 [7%]; 15 men and 5 women), heart failure (n = 14 [5%]; 8 men and 6 women) and other causes (n = 34 [14%]). Most of the deaths from lung cancer were observed among younger patients (p = 0.002), while most of the deaths from pneumonia among older patients (p = 0.02). The most common co-morbidities in the study population included: chronic heart failure (n = 169), hypertension (n = 103), ischaemic heart disease (n = 102), type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 55), renal failure (n = 43), benign prostatic hyperplasia (n = 36), lower limb atherosclerosis (n = 28), osteoporosis (n = 19) and anaemia (n = 14).
Conclusions: Respiratory tract pathologies, such as acute exacerbation of COPD, pneumonia and lung cancer, were the most common causes of death in the study population, while cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus were the most common co-morbidities seen in these patients.
Pneumonol. Alergol. Pol. 2011; 79, 5: 343–346
Get Citation

Keywords

COPD; cause of death in hospitalised patients; co-morbidities

About this article
Title

An analysis of the causes of mortality and co-morbidities in hospitalised patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Journal

Advances in Respiratory Medicine

Issue

Vol 79, No 5 (2011)

Pages

343-346

Published online

2011-08-22

Bibliographic record

Pneumonol Alergol Pol 2011;79(5):343-346.

Keywords

COPD
cause of death in hospitalised patients
co-morbidities

Authors

Renata Rubinsztajn
Ryszarda Chazan

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