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Original research article
Submitted: 2022-03-15
Accepted: 2022-04-24
Published online: 2022-08-04
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In seeking diagnostic tool for laboratory monitoring of FXII-targeting agents, could assessment of rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) in patients with factor XII deficiency be useful?

Paulina Stelmach1, Weronika Nowak2, Marta Robak3, Emilia Krzemińska1, Marzena Tybura-Sawicka3, Krzysztof Chojnowski3, Jacek Treliński3
DOI: 10.5603/AHP.a2022.0034
Affiliations
  1. Department of Haematology, Copernicus Memorial Hospital in Lodz, Łódź, Poland
  2. Department of Haematooncology, Copernicus Memorial Hospital in Lodz, Łódź, Poland
  3. Department of Haemostasis Disorders, Medical University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland

open access

Ahead of print
ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE
Submitted: 2022-03-15
Accepted: 2022-04-24
Published online: 2022-08-04

Abstract

Introduction: Targeting factor XII (FXII) is a new concept for safe thrombosis prophylaxis. Global hemostasis tests offer promise in terms of the laboratory monitoring of FXII inhibition. The present study examines selected parameters of rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) in patients with FXII deficiency.

The objective of this study was to assess the impact of FXII deficiency on selected parameters of ROTEM, which can be significant in the laboratory monitoring of FXII inhibition.

Material and methods: The study included 20 patients with FXII deficiency ≤40% and 21 volunteers free of it. Clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT), alpha angle (α), maximum clot firmness (MCF), and maximum lysis (ML) were recorded in ROTEM.

Results: For the INTEM test, CT and CFT readings were markedly higher in FXII deficient patients than in controls. No marked differences in relation to MCF and ML were found.

Conclusion: The results of ROTEM show that FXII deficiency has a great impact on the initiation and amplification of coagulation. This was confirmed by a number of marked correlations between FXII activity and certain ROTEM parameters. ROTEM tests merit further investigation as treatment control strategies in the context of FXII inhibition.

Abstract

Introduction: Targeting factor XII (FXII) is a new concept for safe thrombosis prophylaxis. Global hemostasis tests offer promise in terms of the laboratory monitoring of FXII inhibition. The present study examines selected parameters of rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) in patients with FXII deficiency.

The objective of this study was to assess the impact of FXII deficiency on selected parameters of ROTEM, which can be significant in the laboratory monitoring of FXII inhibition.

Material and methods: The study included 20 patients with FXII deficiency ≤40% and 21 volunteers free of it. Clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT), alpha angle (α), maximum clot firmness (MCF), and maximum lysis (ML) were recorded in ROTEM.

Results: For the INTEM test, CT and CFT readings were markedly higher in FXII deficient patients than in controls. No marked differences in relation to MCF and ML were found.

Conclusion: The results of ROTEM show that FXII deficiency has a great impact on the initiation and amplification of coagulation. This was confirmed by a number of marked correlations between FXII activity and certain ROTEM parameters. ROTEM tests merit further investigation as treatment control strategies in the context of FXII inhibition.

Get Citation

Keywords

factor XII deficiency, ROTEM, FXII as a target for thrombosis prevention, laboratory monitoring of FXII inhibition

About this article
Title

In seeking diagnostic tool for laboratory monitoring of FXII-targeting agents, could assessment of rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) in patients with factor XII deficiency be useful?

Journal

Acta Haematologica Polonica

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original research article

Published online

2022-08-04

Page views

11

Article views/downloads

7

DOI

10.5603/AHP.a2022.0034

Keywords

factor XII deficiency
ROTEM
FXII as a target for thrombosis prevention
laboratory monitoring of FXII inhibition

Authors

Paulina Stelmach
Weronika Nowak
Marta Robak
Emilia Krzemińska
Marzena Tybura-Sawicka
Krzysztof Chojnowski
Jacek Treliński

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