open access

Vol 52, No 4 (2021)
Review article
Submitted: 2021-07-23
Accepted: 2021-07-23
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Risk assessment of recurrent venous thromboembolism

Jacek Musiał1
DOI: 10.5603/AHP.2021.0081
·
Acta Haematol Pol 2021;52(4):436-441.
Affiliations
  1. II Department of Internal Medicine, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland

open access

Vol 52, No 4 (2021)
REVIEW ARTICLE
Submitted: 2021-07-23
Accepted: 2021-07-23

Abstract

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence risk is determined by risk factors that were present at the time of the initial VTE episode. The most significant determinant of risk for recurrent VTE is whether the VTE occurred in the setting of provoked or unprovoked condition. As anticoagulation reduces the risk of recurrent VTE, initial anticoagulant treatment at the time of VTE diagnosis is indicated with consideration given to an associated risk of bleeding. After three months of initial anticoagulation, recurrence risk and bleeding risk should be assessed again to decide if anticoagulation should be stopped or continued indefinitely. If indefinite anticoagulation is recommended, annual assessment of both risks should guide decisions about further treatment. Knowledge about the various risk factors for VTE recurrence and the risk factors for bleeding associated with anticoagulation should guide anticoagulant duration.

Abstract

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence risk is determined by risk factors that were present at the time of the initial VTE episode. The most significant determinant of risk for recurrent VTE is whether the VTE occurred in the setting of provoked or unprovoked condition. As anticoagulation reduces the risk of recurrent VTE, initial anticoagulant treatment at the time of VTE diagnosis is indicated with consideration given to an associated risk of bleeding. After three months of initial anticoagulation, recurrence risk and bleeding risk should be assessed again to decide if anticoagulation should be stopped or continued indefinitely. If indefinite anticoagulation is recommended, annual assessment of both risks should guide decisions about further treatment. Knowledge about the various risk factors for VTE recurrence and the risk factors for bleeding associated with anticoagulation should guide anticoagulant duration.

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Keywords

venous thromboembolism recurrence, venous thromboembolism risk factors, anticoagulant treatment, anti-vitamin K drugs, direct oral anticoagulant drugs, bleeding risk assessment

About this article
Title

Risk assessment of recurrent venous thromboembolism

Journal

Acta Haematologica Polonica

Issue

Vol 52, No 4 (2021)

Article type

Review article

Pages

436-441

DOI

10.5603/AHP.2021.0081

Bibliographic record

Acta Haematol Pol 2021;52(4):436-441.

Keywords

venous thromboembolism recurrence
venous thromboembolism risk factors
anticoagulant treatment
anti-vitamin K drugs
direct oral anticoagulant drugs
bleeding risk assessment

Authors

Jacek Musiał

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