open access

Vol 52, No 4 (2021)
Review article
Submitted: 2021-07-23
Accepted: 2021-07-23
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Viscoelastic methods in clinical laboratory hematology: a narrative review

Joanna Boinska1, Ewelina Kolańska-Dams1, Artur Słomka1, Ewa Żekanowska1
DOI: 10.5603/AHP.2021.0082
·
Acta Haematol Pol 2021;52(4):442-445.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Poland

open access

Vol 52, No 4 (2021)
REVIEW ARTICLE
Submitted: 2021-07-23
Accepted: 2021-07-23

Abstract

Viscoelastic methods (VEMs) such as thromboelastography (TEG) and thromboelastometry (TEM) offer a comprehensive assessment of hemostasis, starting with early stages of coagulation, through fibrin clot formation, and ending with fibrinolysis. They offer several advantages compared to the standard coagulation tests i.e. they allow a detailed assessment in real time of the coagulation process with the contribution of platelets and fibrinogen levels in the whole blood. TEG or TEM point-of-care devices are widely used in managing intraoperative bleeding, especially in the context of cardiac surgery. The latest study results indicate a growing interest in VEMs in various fields of hematology. TEG and TEM have been used in congenital bleeding disorders such as hemophilia and von Willebrand disease. Both assays offer more objective and complete laboratory evaluation of an individual patient’s phenotype, effective personalized prophylaxis, the management of bypassing agent therapy, and the management of spontaneous bleeding episodes or surgery. We have therefore carried out a narrative review to summarize evidence on the usefulness of VEMs in the assessment of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in these bleeding disorders.

Abstract

Viscoelastic methods (VEMs) such as thromboelastography (TEG) and thromboelastometry (TEM) offer a comprehensive assessment of hemostasis, starting with early stages of coagulation, through fibrin clot formation, and ending with fibrinolysis. They offer several advantages compared to the standard coagulation tests i.e. they allow a detailed assessment in real time of the coagulation process with the contribution of platelets and fibrinogen levels in the whole blood. TEG or TEM point-of-care devices are widely used in managing intraoperative bleeding, especially in the context of cardiac surgery. The latest study results indicate a growing interest in VEMs in various fields of hematology. TEG and TEM have been used in congenital bleeding disorders such as hemophilia and von Willebrand disease. Both assays offer more objective and complete laboratory evaluation of an individual patient’s phenotype, effective personalized prophylaxis, the management of bypassing agent therapy, and the management of spontaneous bleeding episodes or surgery. We have therefore carried out a narrative review to summarize evidence on the usefulness of VEMs in the assessment of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in these bleeding disorders.

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Keywords

viscoelastic methods (VEMs), thromboelastography (TEG), thromboelastometry (TEM), hemophilia, von Willebrand disease

About this article
Title

Viscoelastic methods in clinical laboratory hematology: a narrative review

Journal

Acta Haematologica Polonica

Issue

Vol 52, No 4 (2021)

Article type

Review article

Pages

442-445

DOI

10.5603/AHP.2021.0082

Bibliographic record

Acta Haematol Pol 2021;52(4):442-445.

Keywords

viscoelastic methods (VEMs)
thromboelastography (TEG)
thromboelastometry (TEM)
hemophilia
von Willebrand disease

Authors

Joanna Boinska
Ewelina Kolańska-Dams
Artur Słomka
Ewa Żekanowska

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