open access

Vol 52, No 3 (2021)
Original research article
Submitted: 2021-05-26
Accepted: 2021-05-26
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Blood type does not modify prognosis in patients with COVID-19: experience in a COVID-19 hospital in Mexico

Christian Ramos-Peñafiel12, Elizabeth Mader-Maldonado1, Carlos Martínez-Murillo2, Irma Olarte-Carrillo2, Carolina Balderas-Delgado1, Álvaro Cabrera-García1, Ubaldo Valencia-Rocha1, Emmanuel Bermeo-Maldonado1, Adrián Santoyo-Sánchez2, Adolfo Martínez-Tovar2
DOI: 10.5603/AHP.2021.0036
·
Acta Haematol Pol 2021;52(3):190-194.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Hematology, Hospital Regional de Alta Especialidad Ixtapaluca, Estado de México, México
  2. Department of Hematology, Hospital General de México “Dr. Eduardo Liceaga”, Ciudad de México, México

open access

Vol 52, No 3 (2021)
ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE
Submitted: 2021-05-26
Accepted: 2021-05-26

Abstract

Introduction: According to reports from China and Europe, there are various clinical and laboratory risk factors that associate with both death and the use of a ventilator in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In Wuhan, blood type A was related to these complications, but this factor is unknown for Latin America. Objective was to describe the association of blood type with complications related to COVID-19 infection. Material and methods: A retrospective comparative study from the clinical files of patients cared for in the emergency department between April and May 2020. Results: Data was analyzed from 120 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 infection. There were no differences in age and gender by blood type. Type O was the most frequent (80.8%) followed by type A (11.7%) and type B (7.5%). In univariate analysis, there was no impact of blood type on survival, individually (groups A, B, O) (log rank 0.154). In multivariate analysis, only age influenced prognosis (p =0.004). Above the risk, type O showed no impact on mortality (OR 1.0119, 95% CI: 0.3898–2.6272, p =0.980) or ventilator use (1.5616, 95% CI: 0.4834–5.0453, p =0.456), likewise for types A and B (OR 0.9882, 95% CI, 0.3806–2.5657). Conclusion: Blood type does not impact prognosis in Mexican patients with COVID-19.

Abstract

Introduction: According to reports from China and Europe, there are various clinical and laboratory risk factors that associate with both death and the use of a ventilator in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In Wuhan, blood type A was related to these complications, but this factor is unknown for Latin America. Objective was to describe the association of blood type with complications related to COVID-19 infection. Material and methods: A retrospective comparative study from the clinical files of patients cared for in the emergency department between April and May 2020. Results: Data was analyzed from 120 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 infection. There were no differences in age and gender by blood type. Type O was the most frequent (80.8%) followed by type A (11.7%) and type B (7.5%). In univariate analysis, there was no impact of blood type on survival, individually (groups A, B, O) (log rank 0.154). In multivariate analysis, only age influenced prognosis (p =0.004). Above the risk, type O showed no impact on mortality (OR 1.0119, 95% CI: 0.3898–2.6272, p =0.980) or ventilator use (1.5616, 95% CI: 0.4834–5.0453, p =0.456), likewise for types A and B (OR 0.9882, 95% CI, 0.3806–2.5657). Conclusion: Blood type does not impact prognosis in Mexican patients with COVID-19.

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Keywords

COVID-19, ABO blood group system, mortality, Latin America

About this article
Title

Blood type does not modify prognosis in patients with COVID-19: experience in a COVID-19 hospital in Mexico

Journal

Acta Haematologica Polonica

Issue

Vol 52, No 3 (2021)

Article type

Original research article

Pages

190-194

DOI

10.5603/AHP.2021.0036

Bibliographic record

Acta Haematol Pol 2021;52(3):190-194.

Keywords

COVID-19
ABO blood group system
mortality
Latin America

Authors

Christian Ramos-Peñafiel
Elizabeth Mader-Maldonado
Carlos Martínez-Murillo
Irma Olarte-Carrillo
Carolina Balderas-Delgado
Álvaro Cabrera-García
Ubaldo Valencia-Rocha
Emmanuel Bermeo-Maldonado
Adrián Santoyo-Sánchez
Adolfo Martínez-Tovar

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