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Original research article
Published online: 2021-08-19
Submitted: 2021-05-09
Accepted: 2021-06-06
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Clinical spectrum of neutropenia in children — analysis of 109 cases

Joanna Konieczek1, Natalia Bartoszewicz1, Monika Richert Przygońska1, Ewa Cheremska1, Edyta Węgrzyn1, Anna Dąbrowska1, Anna Urbańczyk1, Elżbieta Grześk1, Jan Styczyński1, Mariusz Wysocki1, Sylwia Kołtan1
DOI: 10.5603/AHPa2021.0084
Affiliations
  1. Department of Pediatrics, Hematology and Oncology, Ludwik Rydygier Medical College in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Antony Jurasz University Hospital No. 1 in Bydgoszcz, Poland

open access

Ahead of print
ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE
Published online: 2021-08-19
Submitted: 2021-05-09
Accepted: 2021-06-06

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the course of neutropenia in children hospitalized at a single pediatric hematology and oncology center with particular emphasis on the assessment of risk factors for severe infectious complications.

Material and methods: The study included 109 children diagnosed with neutropenia unrelated to malignancy. The etiology, laboratory and genetic test results, and clinical data and course were analyzed.

Results: More than half of the patients were ultimately diagnosed with benign childhood neutropenia (53.2%). 74.5% of children presented a chronic course of neutropenia, with a mean duration of 22 months. The duration of neutropenia had a significant impact on its clinical course — none of the patients with acute neutropenia had severe infections or the need for treatment. Among patients with chronic neutropenia, a positive family history (p <0.002), comorbidities (p <0.005), severe infectious complications (p<0.001) and the need for specific treatment (p <0.004) were observed statistically more often in children with congenital form of the disease.

Conclusions: Neutropenia in children usually has a benign course, but the prognosis largely depends on duration and etiology. History, clinical course, and ancillary test results should be carefully interpreted to identify patients with congenital neutropenia, due to the higher risk of complications and the need to treat patients in this group.

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the course of neutropenia in children hospitalized at a single pediatric hematology and oncology center with particular emphasis on the assessment of risk factors for severe infectious complications.

Material and methods: The study included 109 children diagnosed with neutropenia unrelated to malignancy. The etiology, laboratory and genetic test results, and clinical data and course were analyzed.

Results: More than half of the patients were ultimately diagnosed with benign childhood neutropenia (53.2%). 74.5% of children presented a chronic course of neutropenia, with a mean duration of 22 months. The duration of neutropenia had a significant impact on its clinical course — none of the patients with acute neutropenia had severe infections or the need for treatment. Among patients with chronic neutropenia, a positive family history (p <0.002), comorbidities (p <0.005), severe infectious complications (p<0.001) and the need for specific treatment (p <0.004) were observed statistically more often in children with congenital form of the disease.

Conclusions: Neutropenia in children usually has a benign course, but the prognosis largely depends on duration and etiology. History, clinical course, and ancillary test results should be carefully interpreted to identify patients with congenital neutropenia, due to the higher risk of complications and the need to treat patients in this group.

Get Citation
About this article
Title

Clinical spectrum of neutropenia in children — analysis of 109 cases

Journal

Acta Haematologica Polonica

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original research article

Published online

2021-08-19

DOI

10.5603/AHPa2021.0084

Authors

Joanna Konieczek
Natalia Bartoszewicz
Monika Richert Przygońska
Ewa Cheremska
Edyta Węgrzyn
Anna Dąbrowska
Anna Urbańczyk
Elżbieta Grześk
Jan Styczyński
Mariusz Wysocki
Sylwia Kołtan

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