open access

Vol 52, No 2 (2021)
Original research article
Submitted: 2021-03-26
Accepted: 2021-03-26
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Anthropometric profile of pediatric patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a single center one-year follow-up study

Marta Krzysztofik, Artur Kacprzyk, Anna Aleksandra Skuza, Adam Chmielowski, Jolanta Goździk
DOI: 10.5603/AHP.2021.0017
·
Acta Haematol Pol 2021;52(2):110-120.

open access

Vol 52, No 2 (2021)
ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE
Submitted: 2021-03-26
Accepted: 2021-03-26

Abstract

Introduction: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an aggressive form of therapy which leads to malnutri­tion requiring nutritional support. The aim of our study was to evaluate if the growth of children is affected by HSCT and what the relevant factors are.

Methods: We analyzed changes in anthropometric measures of 79 pediatric patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT. Nutritional status was assessed based on weight and height measurements collected prior to HSCT and within 12 months post-transplantation. Body weight and height were referred to the age of patients using available z-score calculators.

Results: Compared to the first measurement, the weight-for-age and height-for-age z-scores were significantly reduced in all following measurements within a 1-year follow-up. The most severe weight loss occurred on the last day of hospitalization related to HSCT, while the height gain declined progressively after HSCT. The presence of acute graft versus host disease (GvHD) and the use of a total body irradiation-based regimen were found to be risk factors for a severe slowdown of weight gain, while acute GvHD of the gastrointestinal tract, chronic GvHD and the use of parenteral nutri­tion were risk factors for a decline in height gain.

Conclusions: Patients treated with allogeneic HSCT demonstrate a reduction in the pace of growth. HSCT recipients complicated by GvHD require prolonged and close weight and height monitoring

Abstract

Introduction: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an aggressive form of therapy which leads to malnutri­tion requiring nutritional support. The aim of our study was to evaluate if the growth of children is affected by HSCT and what the relevant factors are.

Methods: We analyzed changes in anthropometric measures of 79 pediatric patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT. Nutritional status was assessed based on weight and height measurements collected prior to HSCT and within 12 months post-transplantation. Body weight and height were referred to the age of patients using available z-score calculators.

Results: Compared to the first measurement, the weight-for-age and height-for-age z-scores were significantly reduced in all following measurements within a 1-year follow-up. The most severe weight loss occurred on the last day of hospitalization related to HSCT, while the height gain declined progressively after HSCT. The presence of acute graft versus host disease (GvHD) and the use of a total body irradiation-based regimen were found to be risk factors for a severe slowdown of weight gain, while acute GvHD of the gastrointestinal tract, chronic GvHD and the use of parenteral nutri­tion were risk factors for a decline in height gain.

Conclusions: Patients treated with allogeneic HSCT demonstrate a reduction in the pace of growth. HSCT recipients complicated by GvHD require prolonged and close weight and height monitoring

Get Citation

Keywords

children, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, nutritional assessment, anthropometric profile

About this article
Title

Anthropometric profile of pediatric patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a single center one-year follow-up study

Journal

Acta Haematologica Polonica

Issue

Vol 52, No 2 (2021)

Article type

Original research article

Pages

110-120

DOI

10.5603/AHP.2021.0017

Bibliographic record

Acta Haematol Pol 2021;52(2):110-120.

Keywords

children
hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
nutritional assessment
anthropometric profile

Authors

Marta Krzysztofik
Artur Kacprzyk
Anna Aleksandra Skuza
Adam Chmielowski
Jolanta Goździk

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